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General questions relating to law school or law school admissions.
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 mth99063
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#91645
Good Morning! I just got my LSAT score back and sadly it is lower than what I predicted based on practice tests. This is my third time taking the exam and my middle score. My highest score unfortunately was still lower than my most recent practice tests and my first, but I was wondering if I should write an addendum as my second and third attempts are slightly lower. I am at the point where I wanted to apply today, but just feel so defeated already. I was wondering if that would maybe help if I could explain that the LSAT score does not indicate my ability, but not sure if it would even matter.
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 Stephanie Oswalt
PowerScore Staff
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#91663
Hi mth!

Thanks for the question! A few thoughts here:
mth99063 wrote: Wed Oct 27, 2021 8:02 amI was wondering if I should write an addendum as my second and third attempts are slightly lower
Generally speaking, an addendum is not needed for those two lower scores. Schools really only care about the highest LSAT score that you receive, as this is the score they have to report to the ABA. So in their eyes, your score will be whatever higher score you end up receiving, even if that was your first take. :)

The exception where you would want to consider an addendum would be: if those two scores were "significantly lower" (10+ points, depending on the score band) and if you have a legitimate reason those scores were lower (you fell ill during the exams, tech issues during the exam, etc.) But you mentioned the scores are "slightly lower," and that shouldn't raise any red flags with admission committees. Plus, if you don't have a solid reason that your scores are lower, it may sound like you're making excuses or it may bring attention to something that wasn't a concern prior to the addendum.
I was wondering if that would maybe help if I could explain that the LSAT score does not indicate my ability, but not sure if it would even matter.
It can be worth it if you have solid historical evidence to make your case. For example, if you also had low SAT/ACT scores, that may demonstrate that you're typically not a strong test-taker. You'll also want to make sure that your undergrad GPA is above average, so you can talk about how your standardized test scores have historically not been an accurate predictor of your success. But if you don't have solid backing for your case, I would skip an addendum. What you definitely don't want to do is sound like you're making excuses or grasping at straws!

Regardless of whether or not you write an addendum, make sure that your "softs” (letters of recommendation, personal statement, resume, etc.) are as strong as possible. :)

Since you haven't provided us with your LSAT score/GPA, we can't provide any specific advice about your chances at certain schools, but feel free to utilize one of our favorite resources for researching data on nearly all of the ABA-approved schools in North America: LSAC's LSAT/GPA Calculator. This tool allows you to input your undergraduate GPA and your highest LSAT score, and get feedback on where each stands relative to attendees at individual schools,

I hope this helps! Thanks!
User avatar
 mth99063
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: Oct 11, 2021
|
#91953
Stephanie Oswalt wrote: Thu Oct 28, 2021 10:19 am Hi mth!

Thanks for the question! A few thoughts here:
mth99063 wrote: Wed Oct 27, 2021 8:02 amI was wondering if I should write an addendum as my second and third attempts are slightly lower
Generally speaking, an addendum is not needed for those two lower scores. Schools really only care about the highest LSAT score that you receive, as this is the score they have to report to the ABA. So in their eyes, your score will be whatever higher score you end up receiving, even if that was your first take. :)

The exception where you would want to consider an addendum would be: if those two scores were "significantly lower" (10+ points, depending on the score band) and if you have a legitimate reason those scores were lower (you fell ill during the exams, tech issues during the exam, etc.) But you mentioned the scores are "slightly lower," and that shouldn't raise any red flags with admission committees. Plus, if you don't have a solid reason that your scores are lower, it may sound like you're making excuses or it may bring attention to something that wasn't a concern prior to the addendum.
I was wondering if that would maybe help if I could explain that the LSAT score does not indicate my ability, but not sure if it would even matter.
It can be worth it if you have solid historical evidence to make your case. For example, if you also had low SAT/ACT scores, that may demonstrate that you're typically not a strong test-taker. You'll also want to make sure that your undergrad GPA is above average, so you can talk about how your standardized test scores have historically not been an accurate predictor of your success. But if you don't have solid backing for your case, I would skip an addendum. What you definitely don't want to do is sound like you're making excuses or grasping at straws!

Regardless of whether or not you write an addendum, make sure that your "softs” (letters of recommendation, personal statement, resume, etc.) are as strong as possible. :)

Since you haven't provided us with your LSAT score/GPA, we can't provide any specific advice about your chances at certain schools, but feel free to utilize one of our favorite resources for researching data on nearly all of the ABA-approved schools in North America: LSAC's LSAT/GPA Calculator. This tool allows you to input your undergraduate GPA and your highest LSAT score, and get feedback on where each stands relative to attendees at individual schools,

I hope this helps! Thanks!
hi! I ended up writing one because this is the same issue as my SAT scores in that they continued to go down. My highest LSAT was a 161 and gpa is a 3.72 I believe. I am just going to be hoping for the best at this point.

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