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 Administrator
PowerScore Staff
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#40237
Complete Question Explanation
(The complete setup for this game can be found here: lsat/viewtopic.php?t=8562)

The correct answer choice is (A)

Global, Cannot Be True questions such as this one can be exceptionally time-consuming, as there are no applicable Not Laws to bouquet 2. The correct answer choice will therefore contain an impossible combination of flowers in that bouquet, not a single flower that cannot be there. We are left with no other choice but to diagram each answer choice in the hopes of finding that one combination that does not work.

Answer choice (A) is the correct answer choice, because L and R cannot represent a complete list of flowers in bouquet 2. If bouquet 2 only contained L and R, then bouquet 3 would need the same two flowers (L and R) in compliance with the second rule. As we know, however, bouquet 3 can never contain L. Therefore, bouquet 2 cannot contain only L and R.

We got lucky with this question! If you are pressed for time, this is the one question in this section where examining all five answer choices would be inefficient. If you were able to successfully determine that answer choice (A) cannot be true, choose it and move on!

Answer choice (B) is incorrect, because bouquet 2 could contain P and T, and no other flowers, without violating any of the rules. In this case, bouquet 3 would also contain P and T:
PT73_Game_#4_#22_diagram 1.png
Answer choice (C) is incorrect, because bouquet 2 could contain P, R, and S, and no other flowers, without violating any of the rules. In this case, bouquet 3 would also contain either P or R, (but not both, because bouquets 2 and 3 must have exactly two flowers in common):
PT73_Game_#4_#22_diagram 2.png
Answer choice (D) is incorrect, because bouquet 2 could contain P, R, and T, and no other flowers, without violating any of the rules. In this case, bouquet 3 must also contain P, because without P it cannot contain T, and as a result the two bouquets would not have the requisite number of flowers in common. In addition to P, bouquet 3 must also have either R or T, but cannot have both (if it did, it would have three flowers in common with bouquet 2):
PT73_Game_#4_#22_diagram 3.png
Answer choice (E) is incorrect, because bouquet 2 could contain P, R, S, and T, and no other flowers, without violating any of the rules. In this case, any combination of at least two flowers in bouquet 3 (with the exception of L) would satisfy the second rule of the game.
 cnoury1221
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: Jun 24, 2019
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#67077
Hello,

Is it valid to say answer choice A is a major inference of this game without testing the other answer choices? .. Because bouquet 3 can never have L? I notice major inferences are tested in many "CANNOT be true questions.

Thanks!

Carolyn
 Zach Foreman
PowerScore Staff
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#67105
cnoury,
Yes, you could answer A without going further because if the only two flowers in bouquet 2 are L and R and 2 and three have exactly 2 in common, then bouquet 3 would have to have L and R and maybe more. But 3 cannot have L.
I don't think I would call that a major inference though. What is the inference? It is "If bouquet 2 has L then it must have at least two other flowers." I mean, technically it IS an inference, but I would say that it is not major. But, it certainly would speed you up because you wouldn't even have to read any other answer choice. Save time when you can on this test.
And yes, global cannot be trues MUST test inferences since there is no other way to obtain contradictory information. In fact global Must Be True also would test inferences since they give no extra information like locals do.

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