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 jw190
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#31332
Hello everyone,

I'm confused about this question even with LSAC's explanation. I originally got the question correct (A), but I'm having a hard time figuring out why E is absolutely incorrect. It seems to weaken as well.

E basically says that in countries where releasing poll results one week before an election is banned, those countries have citizens that are about as informed as countries without the ban. I realize the argument is not about banning polls in order to make citizens more informed. However, if the ban is basically irrelevant to how informed citizens are, both countries' citizens are about equally informed. If this is the case, it wouldn't matter whether or not a ban was in place because citizens are equally unlikely to be informed about it. They can't be influenced by something they're not informed about. This makes the proposed ban superfluous, and would thus weaken the argument.

What could I be missing? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
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#31335
Thanks for the question, jw190, and I would love to help, but I cannot find the question you are asking about on that test. Are you sure we are looking at the SuperPrep II Prep Test C? I see question 3 in the first LR section (Section 2) as being about the decomposition of paper and nothing to do with polls.

Help me find the question you are looking at, and we'll see what we can do!

Thanks,
 jw190
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: Dec 07, 2016
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#31339
Hello,

Thank you very much for your reply! Perhaps I'm in the wrong Preptest. I'm pulling it from the LSAC Superprep book, Preptest C. I see there are two Superprep books now. This one must be coming from the first. Sorry about that!
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
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#31341
Got it, jw! That test from the first SuperPrep book was from February 2000. Okay, let's take a look!

I think the issue here that may be causing you some trouble is that you are making an intuitive leap, connecting "informed" to "influenced", that may be unwarranted. Our author makes no connection between those two concepts, and in fact doesn't even mention "informed". By connecting those ideas in your own mind, you are falling into the trap set by the authors with answer E.

Since our author appears to be solely concerned with the influence such polls may have, focus on that. Answer A tells us that those late polls do not influence voters, and since that was our author's only concern leading to his proposal to ban the polls, this one does the most to weaken the argument. It's not necessarily that E is wrong, but that A is so much better because it doesn't realy on that (possibly incorrect) leap between being informed and being influenced.

Try to avoid making those sorts of connections on your own if the author hasn't laid clear groundwork for doing so. Remember the words of our brave and noble leader:

"It's a trap!"
- Admiral Ackbar

Good luck!
 jw190
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: Dec 07, 2016
|
#31348
Adam Tyson wrote:Got it, jw! That test from the first SuperPrep book was from February 2000. Okay, let's take a look!

I think the issue here that may be causing you some trouble is that you are making an intuitive leap, connecting "informed" to "influenced", that may be unwarranted. Our author makes no connection between those two concepts, and in fact doesn't even mention "informed". By connecting those ideas in your own mind, you are falling into the trap set by the authors with answer E.

Since our author appears to be solely concerned with the influence such polls may have, focus on that. Answer A tells us that those late polls do not influence voters, and since that was our author's only concern leading to his proposal to ban the polls, this one does the most to weaken the argument. It's not necessarily that E is wrong, but that A is so much better because it doesn't realy on that (possibly incorrect) leap between being informed and being influenced.

Try to avoid making those sorts of connections on your own if the author hasn't laid clear groundwork for doing so. Remember the words of our brave and noble leader:

"It's a trap!"
- Admiral Ackbar

Good luck!
Haha yes it was a trap! I was thinking this was likely a case of one weaken answer being stronger than another, but I've noticed that doesn't happen very often. And, based on the "if true" nature of strengthen / weaken questions, you can never be too careful; some of the hard questions have subtler traps than this. A is clearly stronger, but I still say that people can't be influenced by something they're not informed about. If A wasn't there, this would be the correct answer.

Sometimes the supposedly "easy" questions have traps that may or may not be intentional--it's weird that the LSAC explanation did not address this issue with E at all. The more I study, the more often I read into questions and choices. Hopefully even more studying will help with that!

Thank you very much for your reply! The Powerscore Books have been very useful in my studies and this seems like a great and supportive community! :-D
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
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#31356
Glad we could help and that our books are proving useful to you! That's what we strive for.

I will disagree with you about uninformed people being influenced, though. I see it all the time on social media! It's sometimes easier to influence the uninformed, because they don't know enough to keep themselves from being fooled and manipulated. One seemingly knowledgeable guy posts a meme that says "Hey, that politician lied about X! He's a liar!", and plenty of uninformed folks jump to the conclusion that the politician is, in fact, a liar. The troll's mission has been accomplished!

Good luck with your continued studies! We'll look forward to seeing you here again.

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