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 KelseyWoods
PowerScore Staff
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  • Joined: Jun 26, 2013
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#82627
Hi Tiffany!

The local rule in the question stem for #19 would just be diagrammed as P :arrow: U. The reason that this ends up becoming a double arrow is because it is combined with the second global rule ("The exhibition includes no used research models" means that if a car is used, then it must be a production model, which would be diagrammed as U :arrow: P).

So, individually, the rules would be diagrammed the same with just one arrow in one direction. But we always want to combine our local rules with the global rules we already have and, in this case, combining the local rule in #19 with the global rules gives us a double arrow relationship between P and U.

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey
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 TIFFANY_L
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: Dec 19, 2020
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#82718
Thank you for explaining that it was a local rule (#19's) that was to be combined with a global rule (second rule stated for game)!
KelseyWoods wrote: Mon Dec 21, 2020 2:21 pm Hi Tiffany!

The local rule in the question stem for #19 would just be diagrammed as P :arrow: U. The reason that this ends up becoming a double arrow is because it is combined with the second global rule ("The exhibition includes no used research models" means that if a car is used, then it must be a production model, which would be diagrammed as U :arrow: P).

So, individually, the rules would be diagrammed the same with just one arrow in one direction. But we always want to combine our local rules with the global rules we already have and, in this case, combining the local rule in #19 with the global rules gives us a double arrow relationship between P and U.

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey
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 cd1010
  • Posts: 55
  • Joined: Jul 12, 2022
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#105342
Hello!
I ended up diagramming the following rules as not blocks:
The exhibition includes no used research models: /(UR)
The exhibition includes no research models that are sports cars: /(S_R)

I've seen games where sometimes conditionals are best represented as not blocks (in the spirit of having them be more visually representative), and then games where sometimes it's better represented as a conditional. I feel like I often make the wrong judgement, and then my judgement leads me to not be able to make certain inferences, such as the ones in the solution (R :arrow: N, R :arrow: F, S :arrow: P). I think I had this in my head, but I didn't necessarily articulate them as an inference, so then some of the questions took me longer (And the game total took me ~11 min).

Do you have advice on how to better make this call?
 Luke Haqq
PowerScore Staff
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#105360
Hi cd1010!

To speak to making the call, I can at least make a suggestion. If you see rules that seem to you might be diagrammed as blocks or alternatively might be diagrammed as conditional reasoning, you can always quickly jot down both.

Of course, time is an issue. But diagramming both ways out, if that fits the situation, can potentially better help you see how rules interact with one another (whether that be blocks that fit together or conditional reasoning that can be linked into a chain), and hopefully it should only add a handful of seconds in terms of timing. Hopefully, as you keep practicing games, it will become increasingly easy to determine what the situation requires.

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