LSAT and Law School Admissions Forum

Get expert LSAT preparation and law school admissions advice from PowerScore Test Preparation.

User avatar
 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4681
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#26432
Setup and Rule Diagram Explanation

This is a Pure Sequencing game.

Variables: J K L M N O P
October 1992_M12_L1_explanations_setup_diagram_1.png
* Either L or J must have received the most votes.
* Since N did not receive the fewest votes, it follows that M must have received the fewest votes.
 Iceberg.Human
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: Mar 04, 2020
|
#74176
Hi, I'm struggling to understand why this game's setup is like the above instead of something like the one I drew in the file. Comparing these two, I'm wondering when (in which circumstance) I should put LPOKM as the main diagram and when (in which circumstance) I should put JOKM diagram as the main diagram. (hope it makes sense!) Or whichever works the same? thank you!
Screen Shot 2020-03-04 at 17.28.05 (2).png
User avatar
 KelseyWoods
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 1080
  • Joined: Jun 26, 2013
|
#74190
Hi Iceberg!

Your setup is actually exactly the same as our setup! It may appear flipped, but you have all the same relationships. L is still before P. P is still before O and N. O is still before K, which is still before M. And J is still before O. Your setup is is a perfect representation of those rules. It does not actually matter whether you have N above or below the J-O-K-M chain. As long as the relationships are correct, the exact orientation of some of those branches does not matter.

The reason our setup looks like it does is because we actually started by using 2 separate chains before we combined everything together. So we combined the first 3 rules to get that J-O-K-M chain, and then we diagrammed the last rule (the LPNO rule) separately to make sure we didn't get too confused with all the relationships that we were keeping track of. When we branched N and O off of P, we had N above O, but it really makes no difference which one is above or below the other since there is no relationship between N and O. They are just 2 things that are after P. Once we saw that the 2 chains had O in common, we decided to add the straight-line J-O-K-M chain to the LPNO branched diagram just because it was a little easier to add the simpler diagram onto the more complicated one.

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey
 Iceberg.Human
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: Mar 04, 2020
|
#74205
Everything is clear! Thank you Kelsy!
 saygracealways
  • Posts: 35
  • Joined: Apr 09, 2020
|
#74861
Hi Powerscore,

Is there a reason why you chose to circle the variable N in this setup?

Thank you!
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 3916
  • Joined: Apr 14, 2011
|
#74880
That's just a way to indicate that there is that one special rule about N, that it cannot go last. Another way to show that would be a line drawn from N to M, indicating that N must be before M (since the rule about N forces M to be last, we can say "N is before M" and accomplish the same goal.)
 Marifer116
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: May 19, 2021
|
#89256
Hello! I am a bit confused with the first part of the setup. Why is it that L is left alone when J can also receive more votes than L? In other words, may you please give me a detailed explanation of how and why you set the diagram as such? Thank you!
User avatar
 atierney
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 82
  • Joined: Jul 06, 2021
|
#89351
Hello Marifer,

I'm going to try to walk you through the diagram, but the one above is definitely correct, so please reference it as you read this post. This a pure sequencing so that all the rules give ordering relationships among the variables themselves, there is no overarching linear placement in which to place the variables, as in a linear game. Given this, we diagram simply by connecting the relative placements together, like legos or tinker toys (if you are familiar with the latter).

The first three rules all connect together forming the chain, J -O - K - M. The variable M must be less than J and O because it's less than K, which must be less than J and O. That forms the main frame of the template. N not receiving the fewest votes doesn't tell us anything directly, but we definitely can store that as information in terms of which variables can be last (only M so far). The last rule gives a separate L-P-N chain, but also allows us to connect that chain to the O of our existing chain. Thus, we have the final diagram as drawn above. The reason we leave J alone in the connection, is that, while you're correct that J can receive more votes than L, it doesn't have to, or, in other words, we can't determine, definitely, what the relationship between J and L are in terms of votes received. Thus, we can't drawn any clear lines with respect to the diagram. Remember, the diagram only draws those relationships given to us by the rules or clearly inferred on the basis of them.

Let me know if you have further questions on this.

Get the most out of your LSAT Prep Plus subscription.

Analyze and track your performance with our Testing and Analytics Package.