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 Marifer116
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#89256
Hello! I am a bit confused with the first part of the setup. Why is it that L is left alone when J can also receive more votes than L? In other words, may you please give me a detailed explanation of how and why you set the diagram as such? Thank you!
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 atierney
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#89351
Hello Marifer,

I'm going to try to walk you through the diagram, but the one above is definitely correct, so please reference it as you read this post. This a pure sequencing so that all the rules give ordering relationships among the variables themselves, there is no overarching linear placement in which to place the variables, as in a linear game. Given this, we diagram simply by connecting the relative placements together, like legos or tinker toys (if you are familiar with the latter).

The first three rules all connect together forming the chain, J -O - K - M. The variable M must be less than J and O because it's less than K, which must be less than J and O. That forms the main frame of the template. N not receiving the fewest votes doesn't tell us anything directly, but we definitely can store that as information in terms of which variables can be last (only M so far). The last rule gives a separate L-P-N chain, but also allows us to connect that chain to the O of our existing chain. Thus, we have the final diagram as drawn above. The reason we leave J alone in the connection, is that, while you're correct that J can receive more votes than L, it doesn't have to, or, in other words, we can't determine, definitely, what the relationship between J and L are in terms of votes received. Thus, we can't drawn any clear lines with respect to the diagram. Remember, the diagram only draws those relationships given to us by the rules or clearly inferred on the basis of them.

Let me know if you have further questions on this.
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 thebrainybroker
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#91855
Why cant the order also start with L-J-P ? I realize that this is not one of the options, but if it was, would I get this right if the other right option were L-P-J as the first three options? (with both being followed by N-O-K-M).

In this diagram, it would seem to me that both P/J and N/O could be interchangable in the order sequence since neither are related to one another.
 Adam Tyson
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#91861
The first three variables COULD be L-P-J, thebrainybroker! The L-P sequence is on a different branch than the J, and so their order relative to each other is unknown and flexible. Th J might be first, but it could also be between the L and the P, and it could be after the P. In fact, it could also be after the N, because those two are not on the same branch! As long as L-P is before N, that would not be a problem.

But the N and O are not entirely interchangeable, because while N could be as early as 3rd, the O could never be that early. O must have L, P, and J before it, so the earliest O could ever be is 4th. The two branches at the beginning converge on O.

The thing to remember about these Pure Sequencing games is that the relationships are relative, not absolute. J is somewhere before O, but may or may not be immediately before it. L is somewhere before P, but may or may not be immediately before it. The N is somewhere after the P, but could be immediately after it or could be very far after it, as late as 6th.

So, here are just a handful of possible orders in this game. Watch as the N moves around a lot, but still never breaks the rules that it must be after P and cannot be last:

LJPONKM
LPNJOKM
LPJOKNM
JLPONKM
LJPNOKM

Play around and you can find more!
 salgado145
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#105847
Hi I just need clarification that N is circled just because N didn't receive the fewest votes . which means that N has the special restriction.
 salgado145
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#105848
Hi
I just need clarification that N is circled just because N didn't receive the fewest votes . which means that N has the special restriction.
Since N didn't receive the fewest votes that means that N could be among the top 3 most popular .
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 Chandler H
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#105859
Hi Salgado145,

Yes, the circle is just a way to indicate that N can't go last. Another way to show that would be a line drawn from N to M, indicating that N must be before M.

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