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 Administrator
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#44079
Complete Question Explanation
(The complete setup for this game can be found here: lsat/viewtopic.php?t=3405)

The correct answer choice is (C)

The condition in the question stem forces the following scenario to occur:
J93_Game_#4_#24_diagram 1.png
J93_Game_#4_#24_diagram 1.png (3.39 KiB) Viewed 559 times
Only answer choice (C) does not have to occur, and thus (C) is correct.
 GGIBA003@FIU.EDU
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#83889
Hi P.S.,
I was reading the PDF explanations for LG HW- Partially Defined/Undefined Game 2 Question #24. My drawing matched the one in the explanation but I drew out 2 scenarios which is why I think I missed the correct answer. I'm trying to understand why C is incorrect?
The question asks for MBT EXCEPT I read that as find answer choice that must be false. I didn't chose C because of the scenarios I drew

Scenario #1:
W: F., G
X: F, G
Y: F, G
Z: H, G

Scenario #2
W: F, G
X: F,G
Y: F, G
Z: H

Scenario 1 has H & G in Z. So why is it correct to say it must be false that G is in Z? Can anyone guide me to see where I went wrong? :-?

Thanks!
 GGIBA003@FIU.EDU
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#83891
I meant to ask: Why is C correct?***
 Jeremy Press
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#83953
Hi Gabriela,

The correct answer to a Must Be True EXCEPT question is the answer that is "Not Necessarily True," which means an answer that does not HAVE to be true in every circumstance. This means the correct answer could be something that is true in one of the solutions. But the reason it's the correct answer is that it's NOT true in ALL of the solutions. So, despite the fact that answer choice C could be true in your Scenario #1, it's NOT a Must Be True (it's Not Necessarily True) because it's not true in your Scenario #2. That makes it the answer you want here!

Remember it this way:

Logical Opposite Pairs
Must Be True is the logical opposite of Not Necessarily True (so on a Must Be True EXCEPT, the correct answer is something that is Not Necessarily True)

Could Be True is the logical opposite of Cannot Be True/Must Be False (so on a Could Be True EXCEPT, the correct answer is something that Cannot Be True/Must Be False)

I hope this helps!
 GGIBA003@FIU.EDU
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#86087
Yes, it makes sense. I think I got on what the question was asking because now that I review the question and my work, I see the question asks for what COULD BE TRUE. The question doesn't read Must be true EXCEPT as I stated in my previous post. I tripped up the logical oppositions and i think that happens when I'm on a time constraint because I'm trying to be faster. I have noted your logical opposition reminder. Thank you
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 KelseyWoods
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#86114
GGIBA003@FIU.EDU wrote: Sun Apr 04, 2021 4:55 pm Yes, it makes sense. I think I got on what the question was asking because now that I review the question and my work, I see the question asks for what COULD BE TRUE. The question doesn't read Must be true EXCEPT as I stated in my previous post. I tripped up the logical oppositions and i think that happens when I'm on a time constraint because I'm trying to be faster. I have noted your logical opposition reminder. Thank you
Time constraints can definitely cause us to misread/misinterpret! The more you practice, the easier it will be for you to apply the Opposition Construct, even under time pressure. So keep up the good work of analyzing the questions and trying to determine why you might have missed them!

But just to be clear, this is a Must Be True, EXCEPT question. That means we're eliminating all of the answer choices that must be true, and looking for the one answer choice that is not necessarily true. "Not necessarily true" includes both answer choices that cannot be true, as well as answer choices that could be true but do not have to be true. So for a question like this, I would focus on eliminating the answer choices that must always be true, and then choosing the answer choice that is not something that must always be true.

A could be true question is a bit different. In a could be true question, you're eliminating all of the answer choices that cannot be true, and you're choosing the answer choice that could be true. But the answer to a could be true question could, potentially, be an answer choice that actually must be true. "Must be true" answer choices fall into the "could be true" category, just like "cannot be true" answer choices fall into the "not necessarily true category." It just cannot be an answer choice that cannot be true.

Keep studying and practicing that Opposition Construct--you'll get it!

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey

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