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 mrcheese
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  • Joined: Jun 27, 2018
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#59489
I made 4 templates for this game and it went smoothly once I did that...
 cmorris32
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  • Joined: May 05, 2020
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#76370
Hi PowerScore!

I was wondering if someone could point me to the inference/rule in this game that states that each boy and each girl must be used in each dance? I was originally thrown off by this, because I thought that possibly there could be repeats in each dance of who dances with each other. Should this be assumed based on the fact that each dance "involves three pairs?" I'm not sure where to get this information that there are no repeats in each dance from?

Thank you!
Caroline
 gwlsathelp
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#76385
Hello!

Let's get right into it! I am referencing the explanation of this pattern game on pages 496 to 500 of the 2020 version of the LGB. I interpreted rule two of the game as conditional; however, the rule is diagrammed with a double arrow. I thought that "whoever" was an sufficient condition indicator and "must" was a necessary condition indicator.

How is rule two not conditional? I've provided an excerpt of the explanation that highlights the diagram mentioned in the attachment. Rule two states: "whoever partners Rita in dance 2 must partner Sarah in dance 3".

If I need to add more information or clarify anything, please let me know.
Attachments
Explanation on pg 497
Explanation on pg 497
pattern game.jpg (233.34 KiB) Viewed 98 times
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 Stephanie Turaj
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#76424
cmorris32 wrote:Hi PowerScore!

I was wondering if someone could point me to the inference/rule in this game that states that each boy and each girl must be used in each dance? I was originally thrown off by this, because I thought that possibly there could be repeats in each dance of who dances with each other. Should this be assumed based on the fact that each dance "involves three pairs?" I'm not sure where to get this information that there are no repeats in each dance from?

Thank you!
Caroline
Hi Caroline,

Please refer to Ladan's explanation on page 2 of this thread: https://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/viewt ... 4&start=10
The rule means that you cannot have the same pairs repeat. So if Rita dances with Karl in dance one, then she cannot dance with him in dance two or three. As for how we know that each child only dances once per dance, the scenario tells us that there are 3 dances and "each dance involves three pairs of children, a boy and a girl partnering each other in each pair". There is no indication that a child can switch partners in the middle of dance. So during dance 1, there will be three pairs dancing at the same time so they have to be 6 different people. There is no linear element within Dance 1; it is not as if one pair will dance, then another pair, and then the third pair.


This is discussed in the next few pages of discussion, so please review the discussion and let us know if that helps :-D Thanks!
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 Stephanie Turaj
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#76425
gwlsathelp wrote:Hello!

Let's get right into it! I am referencing the explanation of this pattern game on pages 496 to 500 of the 2020 version of the LGB....
Hi gwlsathelp!

Thanks for the post! I have moved your post over to the thread discussing this game. Please review the explanation on page 1 of this thread, and the ensuing discussions (there's a lot here :) ) and let us know if this helps, or if you still have further questions.

Thanks!
 Michelle G
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: Oct 04, 2020
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#79722
I don't know if this will help anyone, but once I got the three key inferences and used the set up in the pic, answering the questions were a breeze. The dots represent the same letter. I color coded them for clarification.
Attachments
Photo on 10-4-20 at 6.01 PM #2.jpg
Photo on 10-4-20 at 6.01 PM #2.jpg (127.47 KiB) Viewed 79 times
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 Wounded_Bear
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  • Joined: Dec 24, 2020
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#82736
Hey guys,

I tried to do the second Pattern game on pg, 494 under timed conditions — it did not go well. I tend to jump the gun and think that I'm ready to take a shot under timed conditions, then I quickly get humbled. I gave up two minutes in because I knew that I did not fully understand how to diagram the initial setup. I turned towards the analysis starting on pg. 496 and tried to figure it out. Here is what I don't understand:

1) I don't understand how you come to the conclusion to diagram R, S, and T vertically. It seemed so intuitive to me to do the setup that is first shown (but deemed inefficient). Why is it inefficient? How can I prepare myself to make the right decision regarding initial setups (sorry, I have a feeling that this last question is too vague)?

2) Once I do enough games (I'm a beginner), is setting up the initial diagram still tricky? For some games it is just obvious how to set it up, but for others it is confusing. Is this because I have not exposed myself to enough games, or is it because it is one of the fundamental difficulties in the Logic Games?

The Bible has really been great. Thank you. Happy Holidays!

Best,
Wounded_Bear
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 KelseyWoods
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#82826
Hi Wounded_Bear!

Welcome to the Forum! Glad you're enjoying the LG Bible!

The reason that it is more efficient to have R S T along the side of your diagram is that it makes your base more fixed. If you just leave it open as in the first diagram, it becomes much trickier to diagram the first two rules because you don't know where the girls are. You know that each girl is going to be in each dance so if you just go ahead and set them in specific slots, it becomes easier to diagram where the boys go based on who they are partnering with.

You also may want to check out the lengthy discussion of this game that we have elsewhere on the forum: viewtopic.php?f=412&t=2214

Games are definitely something that becomes easier with practice. The more games that you are exposed to, the more you'll start to see the same types of rules, inferences, and setups and the more confident you'll become with setting your bases and moving through games quickly. But there are always games that are a little stranger, and therefore often tougher, than others. Pattern games are rarer than other types so they can be tricky at first. But keep at it and you'll see improvement!

Here are some more tips for practicing games: https://www.powerscore.com/lsat/help/ls ... e-tips.cfm

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey
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 Wounded_Bear
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#82856
Thank you, Kelsey!
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 jasminmccray
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  • Joined: Jan 25, 2021
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#83534
October 1993 Questions 14-18 Page 309 of the Logic Games Bible

Hello,

I am not understanding how the answers for this game are correct. It looks like each dancer is only allowed to be in each recital once, but the instructions didn't say this. So as an example, one of the logical answers I came up with for #16 was dance 1: MS, KS, KT dance 2: LR, MT, LT and dance 3: KR, MR LS.

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