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 fmihalic1477
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: Jan 09, 2017
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#32070
So, if I am understand correctly...

G2 = G1 Thus, -- G G G (Light bulb three must be G because if not, it would be yellow or purple which would make light bulb 2 purple, which is impossible if G must be 2. However, G could still be first without G in second because of the contrapositive laws, no? Of course, then purple would be second with Y/P in third.

One last thing, I see in the initial scenario that there are three of each light bulb. I diagrammed the light bulbs as
GGGPPPYYY^9.

At first, I did not understand the meaning of this but now I understand. It serves to show that, conceivably, the three sockets could be filled with one color light bulb?

Thank you.

-Frank
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 3694
  • Joined: Apr 14, 2011
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#32081
Frank, you got it on both counts! The variable set does mean that there are enough of each color bulb that there could be a solution of all one color, as we see with all green in the scenario discussed here. However, check out what happens if you try to do all purple or all yellow! If 1 is purple, 2 is yellow, so all purple isn't possible. If 3 is yellow, 2 is purple, so all yellow is also impossible! So GGG is the only solution where they are all alike.

Your analysis of the contrapositives and your recognition that G in 1 is possible even if 2 is not G is correct (and important, as it leads to two possible solutions - GPP and GPY).

Good work!
 studyhelp20
  • Posts: 30
  • Joined: Dec 09, 2020
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#82226
Dear Power Score Support staff,

Could you please draw the correct game setup and rules for this game titled "Light Bulbs"? So that I may be able to visualize how the game should be set up and how the rules should be interpreted correctly. Thanks for the help

Brennan
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 3694
  • Joined: Apr 14, 2011
|
#82406
I'm going to give you a little pushback here, Brennan, and instead of drawing the diagram I am going to ask that you take a shot at drawing it yourself and then show us how you went about it. Then we can give you some feedback on what we think about your approach, tell you where you may have gone off course and help guide you back. Start with just drawing out the conditional rules, since that's all we have here, and then see if you can come up with chains that link some of the rules together. Consider perhaps drawing out some hypothetical solutions, maybe even templates based on the color in one or another socket (I would focus on socket 2, since it is a part of every rule).

Give it a go and get back to us with your setup, and we'll respond from there!

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