LSAT and Law School Admissions Forum

Get expert LSAT preparation and law school admissions advice from PowerScore Test Preparation.

 Administrator
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 8203
  • Joined: Feb 02, 2011
|
#82505
Complete Question Explanation
(The complete setup for this game can be found here: https://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/viewtopic.php?t=14240)

The correct answer choice is (A)

This is a tricky question, and probably the hardest question of the game. The question is very difficult if you do not infer that S and M must play the same sport.

Because M and S must play the same sport, when S plays tennis, M must also play tennis. When M plays tennis, the fifth rule is enacted, and that rule indicates that when M plays tennis, S always ranks higher than M. Thus, because M and S would always play tennis together, S could never be the lowest-ranking tennis player, and answer choice (A) is correct.

Note that O (as referenced in answer choice (C)), could be the lowest-ranking tennis player if S and M (and therefore P) play golf.
 wvs
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: Sep 09, 2011
|
#1783
Hello,

I am just doing the Golf and Tennis game (June 1998 Game 3) and I have a question regarding question 14.

In template 1, where O is in tennis and K could also be, is there a set order if I place K in the tennis group with O? Do I use the K>O>P order? Or do I only use that if I have P in tennis? So it could be K O or O K in the order for that template 1?

Thank you,

-Whitney
User avatar
 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4623
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#1785
Hi Whitney,

Thanks for the question. Under Template #1, if K and O both play tennis, then they can be ranked in either order--K O or O K. The K > O > P ranking is only in effect if the last rule is enacted, where P plays tennis.

Note that #14 is a tricky question, and probably the hardest question of the game.

Please let me know if that helps. Thanks!
 wvs
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: Sep 09, 2011
|
#1794
Thanks, that helps!
User avatar
 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4623
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#1796
Great, glad I could help. I think you pretty much had it on your own, but if you have any other questions, please let me know.

Thanks!
 kinzamalik01
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: Oct 07, 2011
|
#2064
thanks for helping us here!
 LSAT2018
  • Posts: 243
  • Joined: Jan 10, 2018
|
#46670
I took the conditional rules to eliminate the COULD BE TRUE answers.

1. Maricella (Golf) → Maricella (Golf) < Paulo (Golf) < Shigeru (Golf)

2. Maricella (Tennis) → Oliver (Tennis) < Shigeru (Tennis) < Maricella (Tennis)

3. Paulo (Tennis) → Kim (Tennis) < Oliver (Tennis) < Paulo (Tennis)


Kim and Oliver (Answers B and C) were eliminated using the first conditional because if Marciella, Shigeru, and Paulo played golf, there is the possibility that Kim and Oliver play tennis, and both could rank lowest.

Marciella and Paulo (Answers D and E) were eliminated using the second and third conditionals. Would this be the right approach?
 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 3882
  • Joined: Apr 14, 2011
|
#63489
Absolutely right, LSAT2018! Well done. You could also use the templates, of which there are three:

1. M plays Golf. Golf is L :longline: M :longline: P :longline: S, Tennis has O, and K is essentially random (can go anywhere other than first in Golf, since L always has that position)

2. M plays Tennis and P plays Tennis: Tennis has K :longline: O :longline: S :longline: M, and P is after O as well (on a separate branch); L sits alone in Golf

3. M plays Tennis and P plays Golf: Tennis is O :longline: S :longline: M, Golf is L :longline: P, and again K is free to go anywhere other than first in Golf

The templates show variations with O, K, M, or P last in Tennis, and S never is. Boom! I do love me some templates!

Get the most out of your LSAT Prep Plus subscription.

Analyze and track your performance with our Testing and Analytics Package.