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 saranash1
  • Posts: 168
  • Joined: May 21, 2013
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#10048
I don't understand how this answer strengthens the argument? This answer to me would support no change in the people who smoke cigarettes.
 Steve Stein
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 1154
  • Joined: Apr 11, 2011
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#10054
Hey saranash1,

In that one, the author notes that there has been an ad campaign, and a cigarette tax imposed as well. The author makes a causal argument, attributing the decrease in smoking to the anti-smoking ad campaign (the author doesn't consider that the increase in cigarette prices may have driven some people to quit).

The question asks for a choice that will strengthen the author's argument, so the right answer choice will either directly strengthen the link between the ad and the decrease in smoking, or rule out other possible causes. This is what correct answer choice D does--if the local merchants decreased cigarette prices to that buyers would not have to pay the tax, that rules out the possibility that the tax was the cause. By ruling out the tax as a possible cause, this choice strengthens the author's argument that the ad campaign was the real cause.

I hope that's helpful! Please let me know whether this is clear--thanks!

~Steve
 saranash1
  • Posts: 168
  • Joined: May 21, 2013
|
#10055
Oh ok that makes sense. Thank you!

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