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 lathlee
  • Posts: 655
  • Joined: Apr 01, 2016
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#74435
Hi.

I had a time to go over powerscore lesson books. Anywho, not all or not always can be expressed some are not which is stated in lesson books. However, lesson books didn't really make clear of and I am not so sure of relstionship of most aren't aka: probably not with some are not. (I might have missed relevant part) In my brain, most aren't can be technically same as some aren't considering some aren't meaning at least of one of the set isn't .

Also, I am making sure of this adjectives: which category, equivalent of mostly (more than half of times, 51-100) or sometimes (1-100) that
Frequently and Regularly belongs to the category of sometimes (1-100) not mostly (51-100). It feels like it should belong to mostly category , but in real life wise and lsat complications wise , Frequently and Regularly , belong to sometime category. Correct?

Also, even though phrase, All the time, logic-technically belongs to always (100 percent) category considering how it is used in everyday english, shouldn't it be category of mostly (51-100%)? Therefore how one should treat it as ?
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 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
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#74440
Hi Lathlee,

This was tough to parse, but here are all the terms I think you are asking about:

  • "most aren't" = this means Most Are Not, so less than half of the time, which numerically is 49 down to 0.

    "mostly" = same as Most.

    "Frequently" = same as Some.

    "Regularly" = this is one that I interpret as Most since one of the meanings here is "usually." It's also a term that could be a great source of confusion if they chose to test it. For example "it happens regularly on the first day of the year" could be just once a year so that might make someone think it's not "Most." But, "it happens regularly on the first day of the year" also means that as far as first days of the year, it will happen on most of them, so you see how our definition applies.

    "All the time" = same as Always. The everyday language usage doesn't apply.
I think that covers it. Thanks!
 lathlee
  • Posts: 655
  • Joined: Apr 01, 2016
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#74441
Thank you sir

And Dave

The reason I asked whether mostly not should be considered or can be equivalent as some or some are not, is :
I think it was one of powerscore staff explained , in one of a recent lsat question, word, few, can be synonym for mostly not. Which made a great confusion in my brain considering that in lesson books , I was taught in powerscore books few is a synonyms for some in lsat world.

I know few usually used to represent a value or a degree lesser than expression some represents in logic and real life but anyways I will post the question once I find it
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 Dave Killoran
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#74448
All good!

If you think about those terms for a second, you'll see that there's no contradiction. Here's why:

Few is the key term here, and because few will imply at least one, it can roughly equate with Some. BUT, and this is the big but, Few also does not mean Most or All, so there's a limit on that term. Since Few is going to be less than half in any situation, it means that Few will then equate to Mostly Not (although again, not perfectly since Mostly Not could be zero whereas Few cannot be).

These are all rough equivalences but you have to know exactly what where terms cover or are where they are limited :-D

Thanks!
 lathlee
  • Posts: 655
  • Joined: Apr 01, 2016
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#74457
Sorry to be pain in the butt

But accordance of what you just posted, there was one lsat lr question that I got wrong past before due to confusion on opposition of very small number ,

" very little/small number/value, " can be equivalent of both valuation of mostly Not and Some like how the concept few is equivalent of mostly not and some , correct

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