LSAT and Law School Admissions Forum

Get expert LSAT preparation and law school admissions advice from PowerScore Test Preparation.

General questions relating to the LSAT or LSAT preparation.
User avatar
 nss210__
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: Feb 05, 2024
|
#105193
I took my fifth attempt in January 2024. My score was a 155 and I was averaging 165-167 on my practice tests. My dad informed me my grandmother was diagnosed with dementia an hour before my exam. Unfortunately, this affected my performance and I had a severe panic attack during my exam. I emailed an appeal to LSAC after my exam to register for the August 2024 exam. They responded saying they aren’t reviewing appeals for the 2024-2025 exams yet and I should resubmit my appeal in May.

I’ve heard mixed reviews about students getting their appeals rejected or accepted. Would it be worth consulting with a professional in order to get, in some sense, an advocate for my appeal? I don’t have any evidence supporting my situation and am very committed to taking the LSAT again. My reasoning for wanting to take the August exam is to give myself ample time to both study for this exam and adjust to my grandmother’s illness.

I also have ADHD and Dyslexia and have been testing without accommodations. In the past, I asked my parents if I could consult a professional, but they refused to cover my appointment and I repeatedly fell under their pressure to test without them. I didn’t mention this in my appeal as I didn’t think it to be a strong enough reason. I actually thought it would hurt my case in that it took me 5 tries to really advocate for accommodations for myself.

Any advice on how I should go about this?
User avatar
 Stephanie Oswalt
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 811
  • Joined: Jan 11, 2016
|
#105321
nss210__ wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 1:25 pm I took my fifth attempt in January 2024. My score was a 155 and I was averaging 165-167 on my practice tests. My dad informed me my grandmother was diagnosed with dementia an hour before my exam. Unfortunately, this affected my performance and I had a severe panic attack during my exam. I emailed an appeal to LSAC after my exam to register for the August 2024 exam. They responded saying they aren’t reviewing appeals for the 2024-2025 exams yet and I should resubmit my appeal in May.

I’ve heard mixed reviews about students getting their appeals rejected or accepted. Would it be worth consulting with a professional in order to get, in some sense, an advocate for my appeal? I don’t have any evidence supporting my situation and am very committed to taking the LSAT again. My reasoning for wanting to take the August exam is to give myself ample time to both study for this exam and adjust to my grandmother’s illness.

I also have ADHD and Dyslexia and have been testing without accommodations. In the past, I asked my parents if I could consult a professional, but they refused to cover my appointment and I repeatedly fell under their pressure to test without them. I didn’t mention this in my appeal as I didn’t think it to be a strong enough reason. I actually thought it would hurt my case in that it took me 5 tries to really advocate for accommodations for myself.

Any advice on how I should go about this?
Hi nss210,

Thanks for the post, and so sorry to hear about your grandmother.

The best thing to do here is follow any appeal guidelines LSAC has and submit any documentation possible, such as a doctor's letter regarding your panic attack, if you have one. Unfortunately, LSAC has the final say here and there's not much we can advise beyond that.

Documentation is helpful for appeals such as these, and it sounds like you may not have it for the first situation. Thus, I think your second point regarding accommodations might have more weight for an appeal in this case. If you are able to seek professional consultation and receive documentation for your ADHD and Dyslexia, that may help.

Thanks. Hope it works out!
User avatar
 splashbaboon
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: Mar 14, 2024
|
#105655
nss210__ wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 1:25 pm I took my fifth attempt in January 2024. My score was a 155 and I was averaging 165-167 on my practice tests. My dad informed me my grandmother was diagnosed with dementia an hour before my exam. Unfortunately, this affected my performance and I had a severe panic attack during my exam. I emailed an appeal to LSAC after my exam to register for the August 2024 exam. They responded saying they aren’t reviewing appeals for the 2024-2025 exams yet and I should resubmit my appeal in May.

I’ve heard mixed reviews about students getting their appeals rejected or accepted. Would it be worth consulting with a professional in order to get, in some sense, an advocate for my appeal? I don’t have any evidence supporting my situation and am very committed to taking the LSAT again. My reasoning for wanting to take the August exam is to give myself ample time to both study for this exam and adjust to my grandmother’s illness.

I also have ADHD and Dyslexia and have been testing without accommodations. In the past, I asked my parents if I could consult a professional, but they refused to cover my appointment and I repeatedly fell under their pressure to test without them. I didn’t mention this in my appeal as I didn’t think it to be a strong enough reason. I actually thought it would hurt my case in that it took me 5 tries to really advocate for accommodations for myself.

Any advice on how I should go about this?
Even though I can't help you, I'm very sad to hear about the problems you're having. Hope you will have luck and someone will help you.

Get the most out of your LSAT Prep Plus subscription.

Analyze and track your performance with our Testing and Analytics Package.