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 srr021
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: Jun 16, 2021
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#87984
Hello everyone,
I am about to start the 4 - month study plan and I was wondering if anyone had recommendations for how to go about creating your own study bible. While I think I will be able to make it more polished if its typed out, I think I will run into issues when it comes to games with diagraming certain rules or other things that are just simpler to draw out. I fear that if I make everything hand written, it will be too messy and disorganized and end up being useful. Any tips? Thank you in advance!
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 Stephanie Oswalt
PowerScore Staff
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  • Joined: Jan 11, 2016
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#88001
Hi srr!

Thanks for the post! I'll ask an instructor to provide some specific tips for you, but I did want to drop this resource for you, in case you haven't seen it already: Creating an LSAT Study Bible

Thanks!
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 Ryan Twomey
PowerScore Staff
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  • Joined: Mar 04, 2021
|
#88010
Hey Srr021,

When I( was a student, I made my own logic games quiz, my own conditional reasoning quiz, and my own LR notes. With the logic games quiz answer key and the conditional reasoning answer key, I wrote out the diagrams, because as you said, it is much easier to write out some of these things.

What I then did, was I scanned it, and emailed it to myself and saved it as a document, so you get the best of both worlds: handwritten and digital.

I grouped the conditional statements into 8 categories as follows:
1. If then
2. Only/only if
3. Unless
4. The only and Unique
5. Necessary/required/etc
6. Every/each/any/ etc
7. If and only if
8. Never/cannot/etc

I recommend getting down all of the basics for each section and then taking as many tests and sections as you can within reason, and then refer back to the basics as you need. I hope this helps, and I wish you all of the luck in creating your study guide; I think it's really smart.

Best,
Ryan
User avatar
 srr021
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: Jun 16, 2021
|
#88016
Thanks Ryan! By quiz, do you mean what do you do if ___ scenario occurs? Or a quiz with examples of a scenario and the answer was the actual answer like on a real LSAT? Or both? Would it be possible for you to show me an example from your guide?
TIA
 Robert Carroll
PowerScore Staff
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  • Joined: Dec 06, 2013
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#88026
Srr021,

I can't speak for Ryan, but I think some aspects of a quiz I might make would me questions like the following:

"What's the correct diagram for a rule that says 'A cannot be earlier than B unless A is immediately before B'?"

"In the statement 'The only students who will be able to attend the field trip are those with permission from their parents,' which condition is sufficient and which condition is necessary?"

I think I would draw those examples from real tests once I found appropriate LG/LR stimuli that involved them.

I think it's also good to have question type identification dealt with, e.g.:

"What question type is the following: 'Which of the following, if true, most justifies the conclusion above?'"

And maybe things like "Name five different ways to weaken a causal argument."

It's also convenient to create quizzes using the wording of Flaw in the Reasoning answer choices, to practice how to identify and phrase common flaws.

I hope this helps somewhat!

Robert Carroll

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