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 leslie7
  • Posts: 72
  • Joined: Oct 06, 2020
|
#83212
Hi,

I timed myself on an advanced linear game in chapter 4, game 1 and only got as far as about question 2.

Without the time I got 6/7 correct but it takes me about 45min sometimes even up to an hour to diagram and solve.

How concerned should I be about this at this point? Is this a common amount of time that is spent on questions? And what is the (honest) likelihood of being able to speed up to do a section like this within the time constraint allotted?

I'm just thinking at this point since I spend so much time on it, it seems very unlikely that I will be able to do questions under the time constraints.

Just wondering on your thoughts since you are all more experienced with students.
 Jeremy Press
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 837
  • Joined: Jun 12, 2017
|
#83363
Hi leslie,

Don't put too much pressure on yourself at the beginning of a new question type or game type in the homework! Go through the process slowly, as you're doing. Take the right diagram-construction steps, make the right inferences, draw the right "mini diagrams" on local questions, etc. You shouldn't expect too much speed at the very beginning of that process (e.g., on the first game or question set or reading comp passage of the online homework in a Lesson).

When you're done with a game (or set of a few games), consider going back to the beginning and repeating those games with the goal of doing them faster. Repeat them until you get to a time that's closer to what would work for your goal score (whether that's 15 minutes or 10 minutes or 8 minutes, etc.). I know that feels artificial. But it will give you more confidence when doing games with similar setups and rules. And it will teach you how it "feels" to be moving at a speed that would be ideal for a test.

Also check the explanations to all questions on games you do. They will often have tips for an approach to the question that will make it more efficient. If you haven't followed the recommended approach for a question, consider how you could remember to implement it on similar future questions.

Just remember, at the end of the day, speed comes from a blend of a few mental factors, the most important being familiarity and confidence. When you first do a new type of game, both of those factors are working against you. The more you repeat the game (and similar ones), the more those factors tilt in the right direction. Be patient with yourself in the study process, and allow yourself to build that familiarity and confidence at a pace that's right for you. Not everyone develops those things at the same rate. But if you persist, you can get there.

Let me know if this triggers any other question for you, and best of luck in your continued studying!
 leslie7
  • Posts: 72
  • Joined: Oct 06, 2020
|
#83420
Jeremy Press wrote: Tue Jan 19, 2021 2:40 pm Hi leslie,

Don't put too much pressure on yourself at the beginning of a new question type or game type in the homework! Go through the process slowly, as you're doing. Take the right diagram-construction steps, make the right inferences, draw the right "mini diagrams" on local questions, etc. You shouldn't expect too much speed at the very beginning of that process (e.g., on the first game or question set or reading comp passage of the online homework in a Lesson).

When you're done with a game (or set of a few games), consider going back to the beginning and repeating those games with the goal of doing them faster. Repeat them until you get to a time that's closer to what would work for your goal score (whether that's 15 minutes or 10 minutes or 8 minutes, etc.). I know that feels artificial. But it will give you more confidence when doing games with similar setups and rules. And it will teach you how it "feels" to be moving at a speed that would be ideal for a test.

Also check the explanations to all questions on games you do. They will often have tips for an approach to the question that will make it more efficient. If you haven't followed the recommended approach for a question, consider how you could remember to implement it on similar future questions.

Just remember, at the end of the day, speed comes from a blend of a few mental factors, the most important being familiarity and confidence. When you first do a new type of game, both of those factors are working against you. The more you repeat the game (and similar ones), the more those factors tilt in the right direction. Be patient with yourself in the study process, and allow yourself to build that familiarity and confidence at a pace that's right for you. Not everyone develops those things at the same rate. But if you persist, you can get there.

Let me know if this triggers any other question for you, and best of luck in your continued studying!
Thank you so much Jeremy this was very encouraging, I appreciate the thoughtfulness that went into this!

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