LSAT and Law School Admissions Forum

Get expert LSAT preparation and law school admissions advice from PowerScore Test Preparation.

General questions relating to the LSAT or LSAT preparation.
User avatar
 CharlesWalter
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: May 21, 2024
|
#106578
I've been diligently preparing for the LSAT and have found the 'Most Strongly Supported' questions to be particularly challenging. I understand that the correct answer doesn't need to be proven beyond a doubt but should be highly likely based on the information provided.

I'm looking for more nuanced techniques to enhance my prephrasing approach. How to develop a strong prephrase for 'Most Strongly Supported' questions?
 Luke Haqq
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 787
  • Joined: Apr 26, 2012
|
#106734
Hi CharlesWalter!

If you're dealing with a question that asks for what is most strongly supported by the stimulus, that means you're dealing with a must be true question. You comment,

I understand that the correct answer doesn't need to be proven beyond a doubt but should be highly likely based on the information provided.
The correct answer on a must be true question will certainly be in the "proven beyond a doubt" category. The answer choice won't just be highly likely but rather will necessarily be true based on the stimulus.

As a general suggestion rather than a nuanced technique, I think that practice goes a long way in helping with prephrasing. So doing drills of just must be true questions could be a significant aid in helping you work on paraphrasing for that question type.

For a more specific technique, I'd encourage you to make sure to diagram out conditional reasoning when you see it on a must be true question. Further, once you've done that, see if there are any inferences you can make. For example, multiple conditional statements might be able to be combined into a chain, which could yield inferences not explicitly stated in the stimulus. It is common for conditional reasoning to be used on must be true questions, and it is also common for the right answer to be one of those inferences not explicitly stated. Taking the time to diagram can be a big help in giving you a sense of what the right answer might be before you even get to the answer choices.

Get the most out of your LSAT Prep Plus subscription.

Analyze and track your performance with our Testing and Analytics Package.