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#28494
Complete Setup and Rule Diagram Explanation

This is an Advanced Linear Game: Balanced.

The diagram to this game is quite powerful since most of the spaces can be filled in.

From the game scenario, we know that there are three variable sets: the seven tracks, the seven songs, and the two types (new and rock classic). Because the seven tracks have a numerical order, they are the better choice for the base. This choice creates a linear setup with two stacks, one for the songs and one for the types (remember to leave ample vertical space between the two stacks since each row will likely have its own Not Laws):
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_1.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_1.png (7.17 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Because the rules have so many consequences, let’s examine each rule:

Rule #1. This is the most straightforward rule of the game, and it can be represented by placing an “S” in fourth space of the Song row:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_2.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_2.png (4.02 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Rule #2. This rule states that both W and Y precede S on the CD, and this rule can be diagrammed as:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_3.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_3.png (2.03 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
By itself, this rule means that W and Y cannot be tracks 5, 6, or 7 on the CD (because the first rule establishes that S is 4th)

Rule #3. This rule can be diagrammed as:
  • ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... T :longline: W
When combined with rule #2, we can create the following sequence:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_4.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_4.png (2.17 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
This sequence indicates that T, W, and Y must all precede S on the CD. Of course, if T, W, and Y precede S, they occupy the first three spaces, and that leaves only spaces 5, 6, and 7 for V, X, and Z:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_5.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_5.png (6.61 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Thus, although all songs have not been specifically placed, we do know how they are divided on either side of S. Also, because T must precede W, we can ascertain that W cannot be first and T cannot be third.

Rule #4. This rule specifies that the sixth track is a rock classic. This information can be added directly to the diagram:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_6.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_6.png (6.57 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Rule #5. This rule can be diagrammed as:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_7.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_7.png (1.75 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Note that this rule only applies to rock classics. A new song does not have to be followed by a rock classic.

The appearance of this rule creates several inferences. First, because a rock classic must be preceded by a new song, the first song on the CD must be a new song (a rock classic cannot be first because then it would not be preceded by a new song). Second, because the sixth song is a rock classic, we can automatically determine that the fifth song must be a new song. Third, because the sixth song is a rock classic, the seventh song must be a new song (if the seventh song was a rock classic, then the sixth song would have to be a new song). Adding this information creates the following setup:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_8.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_8.png (6.96 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Rule #6. This rule states that Z is a rock classic. When considered with the fifth rule, this rule can be diagrammed as follows:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_9.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_9.png (1.77 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
However, we already know from the analysis in rule #3 that Z must be the fifth, sixth, or seventh song on the CD. And, since the analysis in rule #5 indicated that, of those three tracks, only the sixth track could be a rock classic, we can determine that Z must be the sixth track on the CD. Accordingly, V and X must occupy the fifth and seventh tracks, not necessarily in that order:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_10.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_10.png (7.44 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
Compiling all of the information above, we arrive at the final setup for this game:
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_11.png
Dec 06_M12 game #3_cr_game#3_setup_diagram_11.png (13.62 KiB) Viewed 1754 times
 sgowani
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#15199
I am having trouble understanding Rule 5 given in the question.
I read the previous posting regarding the same question being asked, but I still don't get it
:x

The rule says:
Each rock classic is immediately preceded on the CD by new composition.

This is what I understood (RN). I understand that it can't be (NR)
I don't understand the explanation given for this rule, it's very confusing.

R------> NR :-?
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 Dave Killoran
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#15206
Hi S,

Thanks for the question! Perhaps it is the word "preceded" that you are missing? Let's look at the rule again and see what it says.

"Each rock classic is immediately preceded on the CD by new composition."

Ok, so the first part is conditional: "Each rock classic..." So, every time you see a rock classic (R), we know something else is going to happen. In this case, that something else is:

"Each rock classic is immediately preceded on the CD by new composition."

So, every time we see an R, we know that N is immediately before it, which translates to NR.

Putting the two pieces together, we get R :arrow: NR, which is the diagram in the book.

Please let me know if that helps. Thanks!
 sgowani
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#15208
OMG you are awesome!!
I was trying to understand this simple pint since 2 days lol.

Thanks so much :-D
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 Stephanie Oswalt
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#63678
We recently received the following question from a student. An instructor will respond below. Thanks!
Hi,
LSAT logic games bible, 2017 edition Pg 236-239

In reading the book I noticed that on question 12, answer choice D is possible, but not certain a. I understand that E is the correct answer. However the diagrams showed in the game explanation fail to recognize that a possible game choice could start with Y. The game says that W and Y precede S, but it does not say that they are consecutive. Am I correct in saying a possible game is
YTWSVZX or YTWSXZV

If these are possible, then the linear diagram is a bit error in showing T— W,Y along spaces 1-3. This does not affect the answers, but I do believe it is an incorrect diagram. Please let me know do that I can know if I made an error in drawing my diagram.

Thanks
Sarah Elizabeth
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diagram.jpg
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 Dave Killoran
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#63681
Hi Sarah,

Thanks for the message! There is no error in the diagram, but you have misinterpreted what it says, so let me explain in more detail :-D

The parenthetical notation ( ) as used in LG means that the elements within the parentheses must be used in those spaces. So, in this game, the ( T— W, Y ) notation over spaces 1-3 means that we must have two elements within those three spaces:

  • T— W

    and

    Y
We use the parentheses because they do not imply an exact order (that's the problem we are trying to get around by using the parentheses, actually!), and because they are particularly good in handling 3 or more variables where some of the variables have relationships (such as a block or sequence). So, in this case, you could have any of the following orders:

  • T, W, Y

    T, Y, W

    Y, T, W
Note that if the order was actually fixed where T was first and Y couldn't be first, then we wouldn't need parentheses at all and we could just show that! The parentheses help us capture the uncertainty of the order over those particular spaces.

Please let me know if that helps. Thanks!
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 Dania_ha
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#87648
Hi there!

When reading this question, I made the common mistake of thinking rule 5 is represented as NR rather than R--->NR. What I missed is that the word "each" introduces a sufficient condition. Now I know that on page 68, a list of words that introduce a sufficient condition includes the word "every". So my question is, are the words "each" and "every" interchangeable? i.e. whenever I see the word "each" does that mean a conditional statement is being introduced in the rule?

I really appreciate the help! I'm driving myself crazy trying to wrap my head around rule 5 and why it is diagrammed the way it is :(

Best wishes,

Dania A.
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 Ryan Twomey
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#87705
Hey Dania,

The word every and each are interchangeable. I am hesitant to make a hard set rule that every time you see "each" in the logic games you should diagram a conditional statement, but this is more than likely the case.

However, I wouldn't beat yourself up over the diagramming of this rule. I think you could have been successful in this game as long as you understood that your NR meant every time you get a R you need an N before it, and that you are allowed to have NN. But you really needed to see that you could not have an R first or an R 7th or an R5th. If you see and understand that, then I would say you are in good shape as far as understanding the rule goes.

Writing the rule as a conditional would certainly help you understand the above deductions, but if you understood it without writing it as a conditional, you could have still done this game in the correct manner.

But to wrap this all up, I would focus more on making sure you got all of the above deductions in Dave's Diagram. If all of the deductions make sense, you are in good shape. And yes, every and each are interchangeable.

Don't stress too much and I'm sure you're going to do well on this test, and I wish you all of the luck.

Best,
Ryan
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 Dania_ha
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#87852
Ryan Twomey wrote: Tue Jun 08, 2021 3:42 pm Hey Dania,

The word every and each are interchangeable. I am hesitant to make a hard set rule that every time you see "each" in the logic games you should diagram a conditional statement, but this is more than likely the case.

However, I wouldn't beat yourself up over the diagramming of this rule. I think you could have been successful in this game as long as you understood that your NR meant every time you get a R you need an N before it, and that you are allowed to have NN. But you really needed to see that you could not have an R first or an R 7th or an R5th. If you see and understand that, then I would say you are in good shape as far as understanding the rule goes.

Writing the rule as a conditional would certainly help you understand the above deductions, but if you understood it without writing it as a conditional, you could have still done this game in the correct manner.

But to wrap this all up, I would focus more on making sure you got all of the above deductions in Dave's Diagram. If all of the deductions make sense, you are in good shape. And yes, every and each are interchangeable.

Don't stress too much and I'm sure you're going to do well on this test, and I wish you all of the luck.

Best,
Ryan
Thank you so much Ryan, this helped so much! :)

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