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 glasann
  • Posts: 52
  • Joined: Jan 07, 2020
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#76142
Hi - I understand why B is correct, however can you please talk through how you'd approach it in a time-efficient manner? I was testing all answer choices (and just got lucky that I only had to get through 2 test scenarios).

Thanks!
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 KelseyWoods
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 971
  • Joined: Jun 26, 2013
|
#76224
Hi glasann!

Even though this question only gives you a partial list of the order, I would still approach it like a traditional List question: use one rule at a time to eliminate answer choices.

Start with the most fixed rule, the first one: P :longline: M :longline: L.
If P is before M, M cannot be 1st, so answer choice (A) is eliminated.
If M is between P and L, we cannot have P 4th and L 5th, so answer choice (D) is eliminated.

Now onto the next rule: G is before both L and J or G is after both L and J. Basically, this rule means that G cannot be between L and J.
If G is 5th and J is 6th, there is no room for L to also be after G, so answer choice (C) is eliminated.
If G is 5th and L is 6th, there is no room for J to also be after G, so answer choice (E) is eliminated.

The only answer choice we're left with is (B)--and we didn't even need to use the last rule or do any additional diagramming!

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey

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