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 litigationqueen
  • Posts: 12
  • Joined: Sep 23, 2020
|
#80601
imagineer wrote:Hi Dave,
Thank you very much for your prompt response.

Based on all my diagramming and re- doing the questions, I would rank the conditions in the following order:

1st Condition: After having overread the condition and reading too much into it, I understand why its so simple. (I get a bit confused because i thought that if R is 2nd or 3rd, then K could be anywhere according to the rules and vice versa). Am I understanding your explanation correctly? I would rank this as the 45h most important rule.

2nd Condition- 2nd most important rule- because it restricts movement of "H" in the remaineder of the game.

3rd and 4th condition- 3rd most important rule- J virtually controls the game and the placement of the other variables, but it does not provide any certainty as to where they could be placed.

5th condition- most important rule- restricts what can go into the 5th spot.

I think the reason I had so much trouble with this question is because I was trying to combine the conditions and solidify the variables that had only a few spots to go into. If you could provide a diagram of some sort of how I should work through this problem, I would really appreciate it.

I feel like all the variables were moving throughout the game and there weren't enough variables with restrictions on their movement to make correct decisions.

If you could help me out, I would really appreciate it.

Best Regards
Raj
Hi,

I also thought that the 1st condition meant that if R is 2nd or 3rd then K could go anywhere. I read Dave's responses, but I'm still not clear on why K is bound to 2/3 when there is an either/or option - K/R. Please advise, thank you!
 Jeremy Press
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 836
  • Joined: Jun 12, 2017
|
#80652
litigationqueen wrote:
imagineer wrote:Hi Dave,
Thank you very much for your prompt response.

Based on all my diagramming and re- doing the questions, I would rank the conditions in the following order:

1st Condition: After having overread the condition and reading too much into it, I understand why its so simple. (I get a bit confused because i thought that if R is 2nd or 3rd, then K could be anywhere according to the rules and vice versa). Am I understanding your explanation correctly? I would rank this as the 45h most important rule.

2nd Condition- 2nd most important rule- because it restricts movement of "H" in the remaineder of the game.

3rd and 4th condition- 3rd most important rule- J virtually controls the game and the placement of the other variables, but it does not provide any certainty as to where they could be placed.

5th condition- most important rule- restricts what can go into the 5th spot.

I think the reason I had so much trouble with this question is because I was trying to combine the conditions and solidify the variables that had only a few spots to go into. If you could provide a diagram of some sort of how I should work through this problem, I would really appreciate it.

I feel like all the variables were moving throughout the game and there weren't enough variables with restrictions on their movement to make correct decisions.

If you could help me out, I would really appreciate it.

Best Regards
Raj
Hi,

I also thought that the 1st condition meant that if R is 2nd or 3rd then K could go anywhere. I read Dave's responses, but I'm still not clear on why K is bound to 2/3 when there is an either/or option - K/R. Please advise, thank you!
Hi litigationqueen,

You're correct in your original understanding that K is not bound to 2/3! Dave's earlier posts did not convey that both K and R had to be second and third. Instead, he was explaining that only one of them has to be second or third (as the accepted bid). Once you have one of those established as the accepted bid, the other one is definitely "set free" to go anywhere else that's consistent with the remaining rules. So here's an acceptable solution, for example, that would allow K to go somewhere other than 2 or 3: T-R(accepted)-H-K-S-J.

I hope this helps!

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