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 Adam Tyson
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#74762
A numerical distribution should be considered any time you see an imbalance between the number of variables available to be placed and the number of spaces in which to place them. Here, we have to fill 6 slots in the base, but we have only 4 variables with which to do that, so you have to consider what those numbers require. Someone has to be used more than once! Since everyone must be used, that either means that one person goes three times or else two people go twice.

From there, you might give some thought to who the more restricted variables are, and how those number impact those variables. For example, if G was to be used three times, one of those three times it would have to be paired with J, violating the last rule, so G cannot go three times. Same thing with J, for the same reason. So if we are in a 3-1-1-1 situation, that 3 must be either H or M. But maybe G or J could go twice?

In logic games, you should always think about the numbers. Always! They may have little impact, like in a game with 8 variables being divided into two groups of 4 with everyone used exactly once. But what if in that same situation, not everyone had to be used? Then you could have to think about the minimum number of variables required, and how many could be used twice, and how many you could leave out of the game, etc. Always be aware of numbers!

While templates are not always advisable, if you are stuck try doing the list question if there is one. If you are still stuck, try one or two hypothetical situations. What happens if G moves the sofa? What if J moves two pieces of furniture? Play around a bit to get a better sense of how the game works, and that may lead to some inferences and an overall easier time with the questions.
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 Vasilia
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  • Joined: Dec 21, 2020
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#82629
Hi,

I have a quick question about the rule in this game: since every person can be in multiple places, then the second rule if Josh moves the table, then Maria moves the recliner, does this mean when Josh moves the table, Maria can only occur once, that's to move the recliner, and there can't be Maria first move the recliner and also moves sofa/table.

Thanks.
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 KelseyWoods
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#82675
Hi Vasilia!

We know that if Josh moves the table, Maria must move the recliner, but it doesn't say that Maria only moves the recliner. If Josh moves the table, Maria at least moves the recliner, but she could also move the sofa and/or the table in addition to the recliner. If the rule doesn't specify that the recliner is the only piece of furniture that Maria moves, then we shouldn't assume that she cannot move other pieces of furniture as well!

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey
 Ari
  • Posts: 22
  • Joined: Aug 27, 2020
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#82875
Hello!

I am frustrated with the first question, number 7. It seems like it should be so easy, but I have done this game a couple times and I always pick D. Can someone explain why D is wrong/A is right? I saw the "if and only if" and knew to diagram the rules with double arrows. However, I think I am getting stuck because I do not understand the contrapositive with a double arrow. A and D appear to me to be the same. Thank you in advance!

Ari
 Adam Tyson
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#83712
Hey Ari, thanks for the question! I'll answer it for you in the thread for that question, which can be found here:

viewtopic.php?f=160&t=34041

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