LSAT and Law School Admissions Forum

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#91519
argi14 wrote: Tue Sep 14, 2021 7:57 pm From the webinars I have attended on how to craft a personal statement, it appears that American Law Schools, like seeing personal stories. However, for Canadian Schools, do they like less storytelling and more direct experiences that show what they learnt and how it can be applied to Law? I just wanted to clarify that because I am not good at writing compelling stories about my life but have a ton of good experience that is directly applicable to Law School.

Thanks for the insight on the matter!
kristinsmith04 wrote: Sun Oct 17, 2021 8:57 pm I have done a lot of reading on the powerscore blog etc. about crafting a memorable/meaningful personal statement. Should personal statements be prepared in the same style for Canadian law schools, or should they be more generic (ie. my undergrad program is X, I want to study law because...)
Hi Argi and Kristin,

Thank you for posting! Someone asked a similar question a few years ago, and you can now find that response at the top of this thread here: viewtopic.php?p=16969#p16969

You might find the blogs below to be useful for general personal statement tips:

https://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/bid-15 ... statement/
https://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/law-sc ... ever-done/

For additional assistance, we offer personal statement admissions consulting packages to help students craft top notch essays. Many of our expert consultants have lots of experience with Canadian applicants and would be happy to help. You can see all our admissions consulting options here: https://www.powerscore.com/lsat/law-school-admissions/

Thank you!

Julie Lipscomb
Director of Tutoring and Admissions
PowerScore Test Preparation
1-800-545-1750
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 Stephanie Oswalt
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#91576
mayank_vaishya wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 8:38 am Hey everyone,
Background: I am Mayank from India, and I intend to move to Canada soon (by virtue of being a permanent resident ). I am 29 years old and I am an India CPA with extensive work experience in commercial law related areas...
Hi Mayank,

Thanks for the post, and for the background information! Your situation is a bit unique here and is one that will likely require reaching out to schools directly to determine your eligibility.

One important piece that you did not mention in your background is if you have an undergraduate degree. I'm not sure where you saw on LSAC's website that your GPA would not be applicable. Schools do tend to understand that international GPAs are weighted differently than those in the US/Canada. However, schools typically still do require you to provide your transcripts and GPA. Peter Allard's website does state as part of its requirements:

"General applicants must have the following to be eligible for selection: undergraduate degree from a university, or three years (minimum 90 credits) from a university, 30 credits of which must be comprised of upper-level courses"
So first, I would recommend contacting Peter Allard to see if you are eligible for admissions, and if so, how your GPA/transcripts would be weighted. They do have a "discretionary applicants" section that you may want to apply under, but even this still does require at least "two years of a program leading toward a university degree."

This same advice would apply to any schools that you are looking to apply to! Once you determine your eligibility at this or any other school, your next steps are to make sure that your LSAT score is as high as possible, and to make sure your personal statement is as strong and compelling as possible!

Thanks!
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 Stephanie Oswalt
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#91578
holly.cohenecs@gmail.com wrote: Tue Sep 14, 2021 12:53 pm As a Canadian citizen who completed her undergrad degree in the US, I can't help but feel like I'm at a disadvantage when applying to Canadian law schools. For example, in McGill Admissions, I know my file is not reviewed with the other "Quebec applicants/residents" but rather is reviewed with the pile of "Other/US Institutions" applicants, which are undoubtedly more competitive as there are less spots available for this group of applicants. Do you think it's worth it for me to inquire about the possibility for my application to be reviewed among the other Quebec applicants, or is this just how it goes? Thanks.
Hi Holly!

Thanks for the post! According to this McGill document regarding Quebec residents, you only have to meet in full one of the 14 requirements listed to be considered a Quebec resident. But it certainly won't hurt to call schools and clarify their policies!

Thanks!
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 mayank_vaishya
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#91602
Dear Stephanie,

Thank you for your revert. I do, as a matter of fact, have a graduate degree (3 year full-time) in Economics from the University of Delhi, India (apart from the India CPA which is considered akin to a graduate program in India) .Therefore, submitting the transcripts shouldn't be a problem. What I meant when I said GPAs wont matter is, as I understand, international transcripts are not translated into a 4.0-scale cumulative GPA and LSAC uses a service called AACRAO to translate your grades into one of the following categories: superior, above average, average, and below average. These categories are roughly equivalent to an A average, B average, C average, and D average, respectively.

Can you shed some more light on this fact ?

Best
Mayank
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 Stephanie Oswalt
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#91611
mayank_vaishya wrote: Sun Oct 24, 2021 3:56 am Dear Stephanie,

Thank you for your revert. I do, as a matter of fact, have a graduate degree (3 year full-time) in Economics from the University of Delhi, India (apart from the India CPA which is considered akin to a graduate program in India) .Therefore, submitting the transcripts shouldn't be a problem. What I meant when I said GPAs wont matter is, as I understand, international transcripts are not translated into a 4.0-scale cumulative GPA and LSAC uses a service called AACRAO to translate your grades into one of the following categories: superior, above average, average, and below average. These categories are roughly equivalent to an A average, B average, C average, and D average, respectively.

Can you shed some more light on this fact ?

Best
Mayank
Hi Mayank!
Thanks for confirming that! Your best bet is to contact Peter Allard directly to confirm that they accept your degree and to ask how they will translate your GPA. :) They will know best their particular admissions requirements and practices.

Thanks!

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