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 JD180
  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: Aug 09, 2018
|
#57664
"B is faster than D, or else C is faster than D."

So, Assume there could be ties - would it correctly be written:

B---D==C
C---D==B
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 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4027
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#57699
JD180 wrote:"B is faster than D, or else C is faster than D."

So, Assume there could be ties - would it correctly be written:

B---D==C
C---D==B
Correct!
 Imcuffy
  • Posts: 15
  • Joined: Aug 19, 2020
|
#80506
I was a little confused on how you arrived to your answer:

"B is faster than D, or else C is faster than D, but not both"

B-D-C
or
C-D-B.

My answer was:

B-D
or
C-D.

I think i'm a little confused on how you assumed B-D-C and C-D-B
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 KelseyWoods
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 981
  • Joined: Jun 26, 2013
|
#80727
Hi Imcuffy!

Don't forget about the "not both" part of that rule!

Since we can't have B :longline: D and C :longline: D, that means that if B is before D, then C has to be after D. And if C is before D then B has to be after D. Another way of wording the rule would be "B and C cannot both be before D, but one of them has to be before D." Therefore, one of B and C would have to be before D and the other one would have to be after D.

Thus, the two options are:

B :longline: D :longline: C

or

C :longline: D :longline: B

Hope this helps!

Best,
Kelsey

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