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#66054
Please post your questions below!
 lilRio
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#78846
Dear Powerscore,

The question stem for #6 reads "Which one of the following, if true, most helps to justify the above application of the principle?" From what I have read in the PS bibles, this is a strengthen question. However, the correct answer is more of an application of the principle than a strengthen question. May I please ask for clarification of what kind of question stem is this?

-MMM
 Jeremy Press
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#78975
Hi MMM,

You are correct to read this as a Strengthen question. But it's a little different than your normal Strengthen question, because instead of strengthening a general argument, what we're asked to strengthen is, more specifically, an "application" of a principle. Think of it this way: the principle provides the rule (or, the law for the case). The application lays out some of the facts of the case, and a judgment that is supposed to be based on the rule. In a sense, the application is sort of like a judge using the rule, plus some facts, to decide the case. But, in all questions like these, the application will be missing some fact (or facts) that, if we knew them, would make us more sure that the judge actually followed the rule the way she should.

In this question, the rule is that "if someone makes an error, it is unethical for a coworker to use that error to his or her own advantage." In the application we know that the coworker (Mark) used email addresses to his own advantage, which sounds like it should lead to the conclusion that Mark was unethical. But, notice that this specific rule only applies "if someone makes an error." So, we can't tell from the application whether someone (specifically Rashmi) made an error. We need to know that to make sure we can apply the rule. Answer choice D makes us more sure we can apply the rule, because it gives us a fact that fits the notion of Rashmi making an error: she "unintentionally left the [email addresses] visible in an e-mail that she sent to both Mark and her clients." Thus, the fact in answer choice D strengthens the application by making us more sure that the application followed the rule in its entirety.

I hope this helps!
 lilRio
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#79783
Yes, this is a great explanation. Thank you :)
 kupwarriors9
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#89389
How come D is correct and better than A?
Jeremy Press wrote: Mon Sep 14, 2020 3:44 pm Hi MMM,

You are correct to read this as a Strengthen question. But it's a little different than your normal Strengthen question, because instead of strengthening a general argument, what we're asked to strengthen is, more specifically, an "application" of a principle. Think of it this way: the principle provides the rule (or, the law for the case). The application lays out some of the facts of the case, and a judgment that is supposed to be based on the rule. In a sense, the application is sort of like a judge using the rule, plus some facts, to decide the case. But, in all questions like these, the application will be missing some fact (or facts) that, if we knew them, would make us more sure that the judge actually followed the rule the way she should.

In this question, the rule is that "if someone makes an error, it is unethical for a coworker to use that error to his or her own advantage." In the application we know that the coworker (Mark) used email addresses to his own advantage, which sounds like it should lead to the conclusion that Mark was unethical. But, notice that this specific rule only applies "if someone makes an error." So, we can't tell from the application whether someone (specifically Rashmi) made an error. We need to know that to make sure we can apply the rule. Answer choice D makes us more sure we can apply the rule, because it gives us a fact that fits the notion of Rashmi making an error: she "unintentionally left the [email addresses] visible in an e-mail that she sent to both Mark and her clients." Thus, the fact in answer choice D strengthens the application by making us more sure that the application followed the rule in its entirety.

I hope this helps!

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