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 Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
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#76751
Not really, jm123, because that still would not address the argument made by Bordwell that is described in the first two sentences of the fourth paragraph (and that is what the stem told us to focus on). That position is that audiences know what to expect from film musicals because of what they have experienced with musical theater. So we need to focus on musical theater NOT influencing the audience to accept the conventions of film musicals. Focus on theater, not on reviewers.
 StephLewis13
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#82711
I also misread A as "viewers" instead of "reviewers," and I understand why C would weaken the argument. I was attempting to eliminate B, and could use some verification or re-direction. Thanks.

B) Is incorrect because even if audiences attended primarily to enjoy the interludes (musical performances), the genre could still be defined as classical because the film/plot is primarily concerned with the narrative and does not necessarily negate the musical performance's ability to "cue viewers to expect a different structure"

Is this correct? Thanks.
 Adam Tyson
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#82745
That sounds about right to me, StephLewis13! Good analysis. Bordwell seems to think that musical films fit his overall description of classical era films as being "realistic" because they present what the audience expects to see. It's "realistic" because it's a lot like musical theater. Going to the film because they want to enjoy the music doesn't do anything to negate that position.

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