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General questions relating to LSAT Logical Reasoning.
 cmorris32
  • Posts: 86
  • Joined: May 05, 2020
|
#80070
Hi PowerScore,

I wanted to double check that there are no possible inferences from these two formal logic chains:

A :most: B :some: C

and

A :some: B :most: C ?

Thanks in advance!
 cmorris32
  • Posts: 86
  • Joined: May 05, 2020
|
#80132
Thank you, Dave!

I was also wondering if you had any tips for prephrasing / evaluating answer choices for weaken questions without a causal conclusion? I am struggling to evaluate the answer choices and come up with good reasons to eliminate answer choices with harder weaken (non-causal) questions, usually later in the sections.

Thanks in advance for any advice :-D
 litigationqueen
  • Posts: 12
  • Joined: Sep 23, 2020
|
#80961
Hello,

I just reviewed the Formal Logic Chapter in the LR Bible and am wondering why "Most are not" (not most) has the numerical value of 0-49 and not 0-50. Isn't 50 still considered "not most"

Meanwhile, "Most" has the numerical value of 51-100.

Where or when is the 50 accounted for? If it is, is it simply considered half?

Please advise.

Thank you!
 litigationqueen
  • Posts: 12
  • Joined: Sep 23, 2020
|
#80969
Also can someone tell me if "tend to" is equivalent to "most" or "usually"?

Thank you!
User avatar
 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4036
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#81070
litigationqueen wrote:Also can someone tell me if "tend to" is equivalent to "most" or "usually"?

Thank you!
All three are equivalent when used on the LSAT, and mean over 50% of the time :-D
User avatar
 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4036
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#81072
litigationqueen wrote:Hello,

I just reviewed the Formal Logic Chapter in the LR Bible and am wondering why "Most are not" (not most) has the numerical value of 0-49 and not 0-50. Isn't 50 still considered "not most"

Meanwhile, "Most" has the numerical value of 51-100.

Where or when is the 50 accounted for? If it is, is it simply considered half?

Please advise.

Thank you!
50 would be called half. this is because if you say something happens 50 out of 100 times, it wasn't most of the time (since it also did not happen exactly 50 times, and equal number).

Tricky I know, but the LSAT has not in the past played games with the "half" distinction on the test, which is good news.

Thanks!

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