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General questions relating to LSAT Logical Reasoning.
 hrhyoo
  • Posts: 39
  • Joined: Oct 08, 2019
|
#79095
Hi Powerscore,

Please tell me what is wrong with the following argument;

The only possible results are X, Y, or Z.
X is unlikely and Y is impossible.
Therefore, Z is going to be the result.

If there are only three possible results and you eliminate two, shouldn't the only one left to be most likely the result?

Thanks in advance.

H
User avatar
 Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
  • PowerScore Staff
  • Posts: 4027
  • Joined: Mar 25, 2011
|
#79099
Hi H,

The problem with the argument is in the force of your conclusion. You've concluded that Z is going to happen for sure, and that's too strong. The appropriate conclusion is that Z is likely to happen, and that's because there's still a chance X could occur. As long as X could occur, you can't say for sure Z is going to happen.

Thanks!
 hrhyoo
  • Posts: 39
  • Joined: Oct 08, 2019
|
#79153
Ooh, thanks a lot, Dave!

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