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#12 - One cannot prepare a good meal from bad food

brettb
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:32 pm
Points: 2

I am confused on this question. I had trouble diagramming it. I've seen on some other forums/websites the diagram being:

Good Meal :arrow: Good Food :arrow: Good Soil :arrow: Good Farming :arrow: Culture

I don't understand how a couple of the chains are possible. How can Good Meal :arrow: Good Food be possible?

I thought the logical opposite of Bad Food is (not) Bad Food? Therefore, wouldn't Good Food be the polar opposite, something we can't necessarily infer?
Claire Horan
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
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Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2016 3:03 pm
Points: 237

Hi Brett,

I think you are right to point out that food could be neither good or bad and that this problem isn't as logically tight as it could be. However, all of the incorrect answer choices involve a Mistaken Reversal or a Mistaken Negation. They all reverse, in one way or another, the sufficient and necessary conditions. The correct answer, A, is the only one that correctly identifies which clause is sufficient and which is necessary. The problems might not always be written perfectly, but try to just pick the best one!

Good luck!

-Claire
DAthenour
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:29 am
Points: 16

Hi Powerscore,

I correctly chose choice A for this problem, but am wondering if you could clarify why C is incorrect. I have my conditional chain written as follows:

Good Meal :arrow: Good Food :arrow: Good Soil :arrow: Good Farming :arrow: Cultural Practices

Does the term prerequisite refer to the necessary condition?

Thanks for your help!
Eric Ockert
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
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Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:46 pm
Points: 148

Hi!

That's exactly right. Answer choice (C) is saying that good soil is required for good farming, or, to diagram:

Good Farming :arrow: Good Soil

This would be a Mistaken Reversal of one of the relationships presented in the stimulus, and so cannot be proven with certainty.

Hope that helps!
Eric Ockert
PowerScore LSAT/GMAT/SAT Instructor