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#16- "Good hunter" and "bad hunter" are standard terms in

jessicamorehead
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Or is most double, while some is single? How do you know which side it goes on if it's a single arrow?
jessicamorehead
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Sorry I should've posted one question... but more keep coming to me hahaha. Would the correct diagram of answer choice D look like this?


High Ratio <--SOME--> Good Hunter <--SOME--> Domestic Cat

Am I allowed to put that "Good Hunter" connection between the two because they are all "some"?


Additionally, what's wrong with answer choice E? I thought I could connect the two necessary sides of Good Hunter --> Kill Prey and Good Hunter --> High ratio since they have the same sufficient side? Is that incorrect?
Adam Tyson
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The conditional relationship in the stimulus is this:

Good Hunter :arrow: High Ratio (not some - ALL good hunters have that high muscle-to-fat ratio)

The remaining claims are based on Formal Logic (some, many, most, etc. - terms that take conditional relationships down a peg from "all"). They are:

Good Hunter :some: Domestic Cats (so some good hunters are domestic and some domestics are good hunters)

Wild Cats :most: Good Hunter (more than half of all wild cats are good hunters, which also implies that SOME good hunters are wild cats)

We can infer a few things from connecting these ideas together. For one thing, we can infer this:

Wild Cat :most: High Ratio (because most of the wild cats are good hunters, all of which have high ratios)

Domestic Cat :some: High Ratio (because at least one domestic cat is a good hunter, which means at least that one domestic cat must have that high ratio)

Why can we not prove answer E? Because that answer is just another way of saying this:

High Ratio :arrow: Good Hunter

And that is a Mistaken Reversal of the conditional claim in the stimulus. I know that all the Good Hunters (defined as cats that can kill prey that weigh up to half their body weight) have a high muscle-to-fat ratio, but I don't know that all the cats with the high ratio are good hunters. I don't even know that most of them are. The presence of the Necessary Condition does not prove the presence of the Sufficient Condition.

Let us know if that makes sense to you! Thanks for the question!
Adam M. Tyson
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