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June 1999, Question #9

kgalaraga93
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Hi there,

This problem was a part of a game in the Logic Games Bible. I had a very hard time with this problem and was not sure how to approach it. I understood the initial setup with the geologist (G) being unable to learn Rundi (R) and Yoruba (Y) and how the Paleontologist (P), the Linguist (L) and historian (H) can all learn Y. But I had a lot of trouble understanding why the answer is (B) and how to go about solving the problem, even after reading the explanation in the bible. Help would be much appreciated, thank you!

Kim
Dave Killoran
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Hi Kim,

Thanks for the question! Yes, this is a really rough game in general, and this question in particular is tricky.

My colleague Nikki answered a question about this very same problem a while back, so I'm going to first refer you there and see if that helps resolve this. His answer is at viewtopic.php?f=6&t=6212. If you don't mind, please take a look at that and let me know if that sheds any light on this one. If it doesn't, we'll go back to the beginning on this question and break it down step by step. So, please check tat out and let me know what you think.

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
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kgalaraga93
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I understand her reasoning, but with that explanation can't you also say that choice (A) is incomplete as well? Simply for the fact that it only contains one researcher, this historian and 2 need to fill up that S spot. The hypothetical in the text says that if G were included with S then choice A would be correct but then wouldn't choice A need to include G AND H? Let me know, thank you!

Kim
Dave Killoran
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Hi Kim,

Ok, I think I see what is troubling you about this question. I believe it's the way the question stem is worded that is causing issues, so let's look at that more closely.

The question stem states that, "Each of the following could be a complete and accurate list of the researchers who learn both Swahili and Yoruba EXCEPT." So, each of the incorrect answers will contain a list of researchers who, in any single solution to the game, would learn both S and Y. So, if there's a viable solution out there that has a researcher learning both languages, then that could be one of the incorrect answers here. Let's turn to answer choice (A) then.

As detailed on page 321 of the book, there is a solution to the game that includes just H as common to both S and Y. Thus H could be a complete and accurate list of the researchers in a solution who learn both S and Y.

In Nikki's comment about answer choice (B), he was focused just on the characteristics of (B); he wasn't trying to make global statement about how many researchers had to be on the list. If P is to be the only researcher common to both, you run into a problem in that there's no second researcher for S that wouldn't be common to Y as well.

Please let me know if that helps. Thanks!
Dave Killoran
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LawLover
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Why is the answer to question #9 not B? This is where I started to give up on this game. I tried all the answers think they all are okay, and I still do not understand how the answer is B.
Adam Tyson
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See the discussions above here, LawLover, and also at this link where we discuss it in detail: https://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/viewtopic.php?t=6212

We are looking for an answer that CANNOT be the list of everything that groups S and Y have in common. P cannot be the only thing they have in common, because there would also have to be either H or L in group S. THe only other alternative would be for S to have PG in it, and that would violate the rule that says they cannot be in the same group!
Adam M. Tyson
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LawLover
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Thanks for the reference Adam Tyson. The previous discussions that I looked at really made more sense, and I understood it better.

Thanks
LawLover