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#7 - Global, Must Be True

DesignLaw806
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue May 21, 2019 10:29 am
Points: 9

Good evening,

I know this may be a bit late, but I am currently studying for the September 2019 LSAT and working through a study schedule that includes this game as preparation. I thought it might be helpful for some to have an answer and explanation for missing problems.

Answer: (D)

This answer was rather deceiving at first as it does not follow the stated rules. The incorrect answers all have the rules in effect with some variation or misplaced variable that violates the given rules.

(A) Violates the third rule (can be deceiving since first rule is in play at first glance)
(B) Violates the first and second rule
(C) Violates the first rule
(E) Violates third rule completely


Hope this helps weary test takers and studiers.
Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 5:01 pm
Points: 2,461

Hey there, DesignLaw806, happy to help. If by "doesn't follow the stated rules" you mean that none of the rules were triggered by the correct answer, you're correct. But the key to these "list" questions, where they ask you to select an answer that is an acceptable solution to the game, is not that the rules are triggered and followed, but that any rules that happen to be triggered are not broken. In other words, taking a rule-by-rule approach, you look for answers that violate rules and cross them out until there is only one answer left standing. In that sense, D absolutely follows all the rules, because it broke none of them! Here's how my thought process goes as I do this question:

"First rule, if 1 is purple, 2 must be yellow. B and C both violate that, so they are losers" (Adam crosses out letters B and C and will never look at them again)
"Second rule, if 2 is green, 1 must be green. A is good, D and E aren't triggered. Darn." (Adam takes no action with his pencil)
"Third rule, is 3 is purple or yellow, 2 is purple. A and E violate that, so they are losers." (Adam crosses out A and E, circles D out of habit, and bubbles in D on answer sheet, then moves to next question)

Take this rule-by-rule approach to list questions and you will move through them quickly, confidently, and accurately every time. You won't worry about what the correct answer says, you'll just know it is right because the other four all broke rules!
Adam M. Tyson
PowerScore LSAT, GRE, ACT and SAT Instructor
Follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/LSATadam
DesignLaw806
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue May 21, 2019 10:29 am
Points: 9

Thanks Adam!