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Logic Reasoning Question Types

alyshabrar
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I have a question regarding the different Logic Reasoning Question types.

As stated in the LSAT textbook, flaw in reasoning question stems has a stimulus containing an error of reasoning, whereas in a method of reasoning question, the stimulus contains valid or invalid reasoning. Can you explain the differences and give an example.

Much appreciated.
Dave Killoran
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alyshabrar wrote:I have a question regarding the different Logic Reasoning Question types.

As stated in the LSAT textbook, flaw in reasoning question stems has a stimulus containing an error of reasoning, whereas in a method of reasoning question, the stimulus contains valid or invalid reasoning. Can you explain the differences and give an example.

Much appreciated.


Hi Alysha,

Thanks for the question! Two things here:

First, you'll be seeing lots of examples of each in the coming days, so you will be revisiting reasoning types over and over :-D

Second, good reasoning means there's no apparent flaw in the argument. Here's an example:


    Socrates is a man. All men are mortal. Therefore, Socrates is mortal.

The first two sentences are premises, and the conclusion follows from those premises.

In comparison, here is a flawed argument:


    To get an A+ you must study for the test. Janelle studied for the test. Therefore, Janelle got an A+

The first two sentences are again premises, but this time we can't say for sure that she received an A+ (her studying didn't guarantee an A+, because maybe she studied but didn't learn quite enough, or maybe she felt ill on test day, and so on).


The course is built in a way so that as you go through each lesson, you learn to analyze arguments like the above, as well as many other types. This of it like climbing a mountain: as you go higher and higher, it gets easier to see where everything is positioned. It takes a bit of work at first, but it really pays off the higher you go!

Please let me know if that helps. Thanks!
Dave Killoran
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