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Low LSAT Addendum

Legallybrunette
LSAT Novice
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:53 pm
Points: 3

Hi Everyone,

This January, I took the LSAT for the 4th time (I know, but I didn't want to give up). Unfortunately, after 6 months of studying and prep, I somehow dropped 2 points than my highest score(high 140s) which was recorded over a year ago. During prep tests, I was excelling and feeling good about the test. Day of comes and suddenly I experienced EXTREME test anxiety to the point where the 4 hours which passed only felt like 2. I blacked out during the first section and did not absorb any of the questions considering I was too busy trying to calm myself and my mind down from completely having an attack. I do have a strong GPA and resume with good letters of recommendations. Should I submit an addendum as to why I have a low LSAT score and how my GPA represents me more as a student? Thank you.
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 3186
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:18 pm
Points: 3,182

Legallybrunette wrote:Hi Everyone,

This January, I took the LSAT for the 4th time (I know, but I didn't want to give up). Unfortunately, after 6 months of studying and prep, I somehow dropped 2 points than my highest score(high 140s) which was recorded over a year ago. During prep tests, I was excelling and feeling good about the test. Day of comes and suddenly I experienced EXTREME test anxiety to the point where the 4 hours which passed only felt like 2. I blacked out during the first section and did not absorb any of the questions considering I was too busy trying to calm myself and my mind down from completely having an attack. I do have a strong GPA and resume with good letters of recommendations. Should I submit an addendum as to why I have a low LSAT score and how my GPA represents me more as a student? Thank you.


Hi Legally,

I would definitely submit an addendum, and explain the ideas above, and really emphasize that the LSAT isn't representative for you (and after all, how many judges will give you a minute and twenty seconds to make an argument? :-D ).

I'd also try to point out that standardized testing for you has been different than regular essay testing, just to quell their fears that the pressure is the problem ()because law finals are certainly pressure-packed).

Good luck!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation

Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran
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Legallybrunette
LSAT Novice
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:53 pm
Points: 3

Dave, thank you so much for your feedback. Can you elaborate on how I can compact these ideas without sounding whiny or as if I’m looking for sympathy? I would like for my ideas to come off strong without sounding like I’m extremely weak. Should I discuss the test anxiety or no? The standardized testing is the only time I get anxiety. During finals and pressure tests, I handle it well. Thank you.
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 3186
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:18 pm
Points: 3,182

Legallybrunette wrote:Dave, thank you so much for your feedback. Can you elaborate on how I can compact these ideas without sounding whiny or as if I’m looking for sympathy? I would like for my ideas to come off strong without sounding like I’m extremely weak. Should I discuss the test anxiety or no? The standardized testing is the only time I get anxiety. During finals and pressure tests, I handle it well. Thank you.


You can indeed discuss the anxiety, and the localized nature of it. As far as the tone, just knowing what you are trying to avoid will help you avoid it! Just focus on being factual and explanatory, and not whiny or even apologetic :-D
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation

Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran
PowerScore PodCast: http://www.powerscore.com/lsat/podcast/