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T.B.Justin
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:57 pm
Points: 188

Hey,

I cannot recall the exact game(s) this has come up on, however I am confident I have seen it many times, and I have a question that I have been pondering.

What is the typical form of lists, for example:

1. 4
2. 5
3. 6

or

1. 2
3. 4
5. 6


I can see both points, but which one is the preferred construct of the test makers?


Thank you, I value your input.
Jay Donnell
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:04 pm
Points: 76

Hmm, I love popping to help with any LG question I can, but I'm not sure what you're asking here.

Can you elaborate what you mean by 'lists' and what these numbers refer to so that I can help give a proper response?
T.B.Justin
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:57 pm
Points: 188

Hey Jay,

For example, say there are 6 houses on a street, L M N P S T, and each of these houses have one mailbox either Red (R) or Black (B), so with that, I will try to picturize my question:

L: (R) N: (B)
M: (B) S: (R)
P: (B) T: (B)

I have seen questions asking for the numerical sequence one through six for which house, in this instance, receives mail first and so on, so does this help you understand the question I am asking?
Jay Donnell
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:04 pm
Points: 76

Hmm, still not quite sure.

If your goal in that game is to simply arrange the homeowners to certain houses along a street, with or without an extra category like the colored mailbox in this example, then that should look like:

R/B: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
HO: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
1 2 3 4 5 6


But, I'm not sure that's what you're asking. If you are inquiring about how the houses should be numbered if we are assigning people to houses along BOTH sides of a street, then in every single game in which that's an issue, the LSAT has always made clear in what orientation the numbered houses face each other across the street.

For example, this game from December 2000:

There are exactly ten stores and no other buildings on Oak Street. On the north side of the street, from west to east, are stores 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9; on the south side of the street, also from west to east, are stores 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. The stores on the north side are located directly across the street from those on the south side, facing each other in pairs, as follows: 1 and 2; 3 and 4; 5 and 6; 7 and 8; 9 and 10. Each store is decorated with lights in exactly one of the following colors: green, red, and yellow.

That makes it very clear as to how we must order the houses to comply with the game structure.

Is that closer to what you're asking about?
T.B.Justin
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 186
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:57 pm
Points: 188

Hey Jay,

No, I will post an example of what I am referring to when I come across one.