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Schools and March LSAT

Ssouki
LSAT Leader
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 2:01 am
Points: 38

Hello,

Among the schools that said they will not take the March Lsat into consideration when making a decision on admissions, would they still factor it into scholarship considetations? I am trying to figure out if it makes sense to test in March for scholarships when applying to those schools that don't take the March Lsat when deciding admissions.

Thank you
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
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Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:18 pm
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Yes, it will. I've seen this many times before: student gets admitted using earlier score, then before committing takes a later LSAT and scores more highly, returns to school and negotiates a better aid package. This is standard practice these days!

I've also seen students not yet admitted use a later score to get in. The bottom line: higher scores make a difference.

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
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Ssouki
LSAT Leader
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 2:01 am
Points: 38

Thank you, Dave. So, as a someone who hard already taken the LSAT 3 times in a row. I took all (PT84, 85, 86). How do you advise me to study for the next one, which will obviosuly be my last, if I decide to retake? I exhausted all recent tests. I did not take all as full PT but sections too. I have a 4.0, and I am doing whatever it takes to get into a top school. Any advice?

Thank you
Brook Miscoski
PowerScore Staff
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Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018 6:38 am
Points: 279

Ssouki,

It would be helpful to know where your score is at, but I'll assume that it's where your earlier practice scores were at (a previous discussion). I would continue with Dave's advice on reading stimuli and passages--in particular, on identifying the critical elements of those. You might not feel this way, but those scores already represent performing at a high level, so generalities are not going to help as much as your situational awareness on individual questions. You should feel comfortable reviewing material you've already seen and thinking through how you can efficiently arrive at the answer.

Also, take some of the pressure off of yourself. I know that it's important for you to go to a top 8 school, but there are great law schools and great lawyers from a much wider array of schools. You are a 4.0 student. Get into a good school and then perform at your highest level. You can try to transfer into a top 8 school your 2L year if you don't get into your target schools. Hundreds of people do that each year. I'm not saying to give up on the LSAT. What I am saying is take some of the performance pressure off of yourself since this isn't your only chance.