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#8 - Editorial: Our political discussions tend to focus

T.B.Justin
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:57 pm
Points: 226

I have the reason that (B) is incorrect because the editorialist is not assuming those (political discussions that focus on the flaws of the nation's leaders) "will become more common."

When I negate the incorrect answer choice (D), Some in the nation have made the effort to critically examine the details of the nation's institutions and procedures, and apply it to the conclusion I have no reaction to it, so I think it has no affect on the argument, and thus is not an assumption that the editorialist has relied upon.

In regards to the argument, as a whole, I think the voting process for selecting the nation's leader is part of the nation's institutions and procedures that enable such people to attain positions of power. So, we(the people) are selecting leaders with flaws that a majority of us (can be argued against in certain cases) accepted, and now according to the stimulus, we are being distracted by that fact (acceptance). That can bring up the question of whom people have the distraction with, oneself or the nation's leaders.
Brook Miscoski
PowerScore Staff
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TB Justin,

The stimulus fails to establish that it's unhelpful to focus on the flaws of leaders. Keeping that in mind:

(B) Doesn't tell us whether it's unhelpful, just that there will be more of it.
(D) The stimulus is about whether we're being distracted, not about whether zero people are studying the problem.

You are correct that, in negation, (D) will have no effect on the argument. I think you can eliminate before that stage.
T.B.Justin
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 224
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:57 pm
Points: 226

Hey Brook,

Did you find 'D' irrelevant, because it isn't about being distracted. (Obviously, yes)

:-D