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Quick Question! [correlation/conditionals]

Dianapoo
LSAT Apprentice
 
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Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2018 10:37 am
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Hi!

I was wondering, is a correlation different than a conditional? I know that for conditionals and cause-and-effect you have to be reeally careful. But I was thinking that if two things have a positive correlation, it's impossible to know which one is the necessary and which one is the sufficient, or whether such an assignment can even be made?




Specifically, if we know C causes both A and B, where A and B have a positive correlation, will an increase in A be sufficient to know that B goes up and vice versa, making both A and B necessary and sufficient for the other? :-? :-? :-? whoa :-? :-? :-?
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
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Hi Diana,

Thanks for the question! The answer is that a a correlation is different than a conditional. A correlation just means two things are related in some way (crime goes up during the summer, so the two are correlated). A conditional relationship is a very specific kind of relationship with certain identifiable features.

As for your specific question, the answers are No. We don't magnitude, and while a positive correlation would suggest that both A and B rise, we don't know that they are nec/suf for each other.

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
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Dianapoo
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2018 10:37 am
Points: 8

Dave Killoran wrote:Hi Diana,

Thanks for the question! The answer is that a a correlation is different than a conditional. A correlation just means two things are related in some way (crime goes up during the summer, so the two are correlated). A conditional relationship is a very specific kind of relationship with certain identifiable features.

As for your specific question, the answers are No. We don't magnitude, and while a positive correlation would suggest that both A and B rise, we don't know that they are nec/suf for each other.

Thanks!


Oh that makes sense! Conditionals don't even take into account correlations. You can have a positive correlation where one increases and the other increases, but not a... positive conditional :P since they are "stagnant" in a way.

Thank you so much