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#14 - Criminologist: A judicial system that tries and punish

Nina
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As for answer choice B "about one-fourth of all suspects first arrested for a crime are actually innocent", why is it incorrect? :roll:
Many Thanks!
Joshua Kronick
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Hey Nina, great question! Notice how the author is only making his conclusion in regard to violent criminals. He is concerned only with how a prompt punishment for criminals deters crime. Answer choice A in fact weakens that relationship, because if criminals do not think before they act, how can prompt punishment be considered a deterrent? It never went through their head while they were committing the crime. Answer choice B is is talking about something the author isn't committed to, those who are "suspects." Be very careful for answer choices that are overly vague, broad, or seem to be dealing with a subject matter that is outside what the author is commenting on.
Nina
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Hi Josh,

Thank you for your response! It is very helpful ;)
htngo12
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Hi,

I didn't get this argument as I was reading it. The only thing I picked up was the conditional statement of "A judicial system that tries and punishes criminals without delay is an effective deterrent."

As I am rereading the stem, the conclusion states "If potential violent criminals know that being caught means prompt punishment, they will hesitate to break the law."

With your explanation of the argument, the criminologist is only concerned with punishing criminals as an effective deterrent.

As I put the pieces together, the gap is where the criminals know about the prompt punishment. I could look at it as "Do criminals really ever think about their consequences before their crimes, even if they are repeated offenders?"

Since the answer would be "no", then answer (A) weakens the argument because it counters the notion of criminals knowing, right?

I originally picked (C) as my answer, but then realized it was a wrong choice. Is my reasoning with this argument on the right track?
Clay Cooper
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Hi htngo12,

Your understanding is spot-on. Good job!