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What is 'no ties'?

Stephanie Turaj
PowerScore Staff
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We recently received the following question from a student. An instructor will respond below. Thank you!

Good morning,

Here is my question and thank you.

What is 'no ties'? And what is its relevance to both pure sequencing and Linearity, linear games? Pages 426-440 setup, pure sequencing chapter 7.

Is 'no ties' the same as no laws I saw in chapter 3 setup examples linear games ? Chapter3 pages 50-53

Does it mean example: t-o-l were t and l have an inherent order relationship to o but if not mentioned in the rules, t and l no relationship thereby no ties........ to one another, therefore this dual option can be placed without restriction in the first or last slots , places?
Are there conditional statements behind this no ties but not both either or sufficient and necessary, to make things more frustrating yet interesting?
I know, I know, my question very long and convoluted but that's my mind and I apologize, but this is basically it.

Tell me what pages respectfully requesting where to read thoroughly and practice thereafter on chapters 3 and 7?

Thank you and please have a good day.

Raini
Dave Killoran
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Hi Raini,

"No ties" means that two variables cannot occupy the same spot. So, if you had a Linear or Sequencing game with 5 variables for 5 positions, each of the 5 variables would have to be in a distinct spot (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5). this would mean that if a variable were in, say, spot 2, no other variable could be in that spot. If ties were allowed (or are allowed in a game), then the number of options increases considerably, because if you put a variable in spot 2, it doesn't "close" that post and other variables could still appear there. Always be on the watch for language that allows or disallows ties, and know that games with no ties are usually easier.

I hope that helps. Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran
Stephanie Turaj
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 242
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 11:02 am
Points: 311

The student responded below. Thanks!

Thank you.

My Next question: what chapter and page numbers I can go to practice so I know that I thoroughly understood the answer to my question I need to practice on respectfully request please?

My last request please, on pages 426 to 427 chapter 7 on pure sequencing where:{ m=j} means always equal ? But why? When clearly j is not faster than m therefore is this an example of that ‘no ties’? Why this equal double line sign? I would respectfully like an answer to this logic game example especially, and its again chapter 7 pages 426 to 427? Thank you. What other problems to focus intense on for practice?

Thanks.

Good day,
RAINI
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
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Posts: 3108
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:18 pm
Points: 3,104

Hi Raini,

My responses are below:


My Next question: what chapter and page numbers I can go to practice so I know that I thoroughly understood the answer to my question I need to practice on respectfully request please?

I'm not sure I'm following your question clearly. Do you mean what pages can you go to to practice games with no ties? That would be all the drills and practice sets in the Basic Linear, Advanced Linear, and Sequencing-related chapters. But keep in mind, we want you to have to identify in each game whether ties exist or not, since that's what you need to do on the actual test.


My last request please, on pages 426 to 427 chapter 7 on pure sequencing where:{ m=j} means always equal ? But why? When clearly j is not faster than m therefore is this an example of that ‘no ties’? Why this equal double line sign? I would respectfully like an answer to this logic game example especially, and its again chapter 7 pages 426 to 427? Thank you. What other problems to focus intense on for practice?

It doesn't mean equal, it means "possibly equal," as noted on page 426. So, basically, it simply means "not faster than," which is the same as "less than OR equal to." Symbolically, you can show that any way you want, but because we used a single line for greater than, we then used a double line for "less than or equal to" since it includes equal; but that's not an equal symbol.

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran