to the top

#25 - In a car accident, air bags greatly reduce the risk of

akanshalsat
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:32 pm
Points: 103

Hey!

I'm confused about why B is wrong and D is correct... In fact, I don't really understand what D is saying. C makes sense b/c perhaps cars without airbags are less likely to get into accidents bc some cars without airbags could have other features protecting them from injury?

Super confused!

Best,
AKansha
Rachael Wilkenfeld
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:55 am
Points: 124

Hi Akansha,

The stimulus here says that because cars without airbags are less likely to be in a car accident than cars with airbags, cars with airbags are no safer than cars without airbags. Upon reading it, I immediately note that it sounds wrong. In fact, they gave no indication of how they determined "safer." Are they only considering frequency of accidents? What about severity of injuries? Or frequency of fatalities? These would all seem relevant for an overall determination of "safer."

With answer choice (B) it doesn't deny the possibility that cars without airbags have other safety features. It doesn't discuss this at all.

With regard to answer choice (C) it doesn't overlook the possibility that any given accident could include both cars with airbags and cars without. It acknowledges that cars with and without airbags get into accidents. The question is if the frequency of those accidents is the determiner of safety ratings.

Answer choice (D) is the only answer to addresses the determination of "safety." It describes the flaw as assuming that the frequency of an accident was at least as important as other factors in determining relative safety.

Hope that helps!
Rachael
akanshalsat
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:32 pm
Points: 103

Oh ok, I think I saw "denies the possibility" as meaning they "overlooked it" since they didnt really talk about it. But I guess "denying" means that they outwardly oppose it in the stimulus