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#19 - Faden: Most of our exercise machines are still in use

milanproda@me.com
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Hello,

I am a newbie, so please forgive me for any mistakes that I am making in regards to forum protocol. I have a question that is taken from the LSAT SuperPrep book. The Question is Prep Test C: Logical Reasoning Section 3, Question 19. I realiz that copyright laws may prohibit me from writing out the question on this board. Please let me know what is the best way to get help on this question.

The question is about two people (Faden and Greenwall) discussing a survey of exercise machines.

The question asks to describe the flaw in reasoning.

The OA to the question is D. However, I was stuck between B & D. I am not sure how answer choice B can be wrong. Greenwall states that the people who took the survey could be easily be lying. But Greenwall has no valid reason to believe this (For example, if Greenwall a different survey that was flawed or if he knew a friend who lied on the survey). Yet Greenwall mentions none of the above, he just presumes that people are lying.

The trick may be that he did not presume, he just stated his opinion. I am not sure.

Again,I apologize if I made any errors.

Milan
Steve Stein
PowerScore Staff
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Thanks for your question--I believe it is from Test B of the SuperPrep.

The dialogue between Faden and Greenwall is limited to the topic of their customer survey, and Greenwall simply makes the point that "many" of their customers could be lying. Now, take a look at incorrect answer choice B, and how broad an assumption it ascribes to Greenwall: it says that he presumes that most people are dishonest about their personal habits.

Often an incorrect answer choice can be ruled out based on a single word or phrase. In this case, Greenwall's comments do not commit him to the position that the majority of people (that is, most people in the world) are dishonest with regard to their personal habits, so this choice can be ruled out of contention.

Let me know whether that clears this one up--thanks!

~Steve
Steve Stein
PowerScore Test Preparation
milanproda@me.com
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Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 12:06 pm
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Thank you for the explanation. I understand the* essence of my mistake.

In "flaw of reasoning" questions, should our approach be similar to Must be true question types (where we can only prove an answer from the passage) or more like strengthen/weaken (where we bring outside information)? I ask this because if "flaw questions" can be taken as must be true questions, then eliminating wrong answer choices such as choice B in this question would be much more straightforward.
Steve Stein
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Thanks for your response. Some flaw questions are worded such that the answer does not come directly from the passage (e.g., The reporter's argument is flawed because the reported does not consider the possibility that:)

With that said, you can confidently rule out any answer choice that is inaccurate according to the passage (as with answer choice B in the question that we have been discussing).

Interesting question! May I ask how you have been preparing thus far? Classes, books? Let me know, and let me know whether the question that we've been discussing is clear--thanks!

~Steve
Steve Stein
PowerScore Test Preparation
milanproda@me.com
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 12:06 pm
Points: 0

Hey Steve,

Sorry for the delayed response, I was on vacation without my computer.

I am currently studying by myself. I am almost finished with the 3 Powerscore Bibles. I signed up for the PS course in Boston Mass, that starts April 17th. I have registered for the June 11 LSAT.

After reading through the Flaw in reasoning chapters, I saw that reasoning questions must be treated as must be true, which answers my question. Tricky questions though!