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RC Feeling

LawLover
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I feel like from reading the Reading Comprehension Bible the idea of EVERY passage we read is to use the VIEWSTAMP method. Is that the case. I am not going to lie, but I am almost done with the book, and I just feel that our goal is to write a little summary of each paragraph, and use VIEWSTAMP. Is that what we are supposed to do for ALL the passages we read? I feel it has helped me, but I want to do it the right way so I can maximize my LSAT score. Also I will not lie, but I feel like this book yes helpful but I feel it is very redundant and no matter the passage you do the same thing. Is that essentially what I am supposed to be doing the same thing for each? I know I am asking a lot of questions in this one post. I just feel like this book for me is a lot of doing the same thing over and over again whereas the other two LSAT bibles had different parts and you did different tasks for different types of things.

LawLover
LawLover
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Is the following idea a bad idea? I am almost tempted to not finish the RC Bible. The reasons I have are as follows. I feel that for every passage for me I will use the VIEWSTAMP method obviously, label each question with the SR, CR, GR, and for me I will have to write a little two sentences about what each paragraph of a passage is about. Is this a bad method? Is that appropriate? RC is the hardest section for me, but I feel that the book is very redundant for me, and is very hard to keep reading.
Dave Killoran
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Ok, I'm going to be a bit blunt here so as to eliminate misconceptions. Please take it as intended—as an effort to help :-D


    Broadly, no, that's not what we are advocating you do. ViewStamp is a recognition tool, not a rigid checklist. It helps you identify the primary elements as they come onto the scene in each passage. Lots of viewpoints? Sweet, you won't miss them and will know how to keep them straight. Very few viewpoints? Great, you've covered it quickly then. Unusual author attitude? Good, you'll see it and know it's different. Bland author attitude? Also great, noted and you move on quickly. It's a lot like a radar screen in air traffic control: it shows you what's on the screen and what needs tracking. See two planes heading at each other? Good, we identify that and act, just like if we see two viewpoints that are opposed to each other in a passage. And so on...

    Write a summary of each paragraph? That's only recommended if you are having serious difficulties in the passage, and it's NOT the strategy we recommend as a general approach (unless it helps you, then it's fine; each person is different). You don't need a summary unless you can't remember what was in the paragraph.

    You mentioned, "no matter the passage you do the same thing." Yes, that's actually the broad structural idea here—you want to be a consistent reader and to generally read things in a similar way each time. This is because RC is so big that you have to get through the passage first because dealing with the things that change each time (the questions). What changes as you read is what's important/central in each passage (that's the power of ViewStamp, it captures the relevant factors each and every time),the little topical clues they give you about topics such as science or diversity, and the exact questions themselves. the same is true in LR, by the way, but you move on faster since those are shorter. What you mention as a sort of criticism is in fact the strength of all high scorers and good systems: we are consistent in how we do things, which is why we can score so highly, and why we know when a problem is of higher difficulty!

    Labelling questions: you don't need to explicitly label each questions with a notation; instead, you simply to need to quickly recognize the scope of what the question asks, and move on accordingly. If you are labelling everything, you are wasting time. This is a good example of memorization aiding you: once you know the broad Q types, you see it, recognize it, and move on accordingly. you don't need to stop to label it or otherwise stop at all. Fast and furious is how you move through these questions, taking in info at a fast clip and smashing through the answer choices.

Hopefully the above covers the main points, but it seems you have drawn a sort of slow, laborious method out of what we advocate, which is something we would never recommend to people. You need to know all the things discussed in the book, but then integrate them internally precisely so you don't have to stop or slow down while reading and answering the questions. Does that make sense? Please let me know.

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
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LawLover
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Dave,
Yes it does make sense, and I will finish the entire book. I do want to get a good grasp on this material.

LawLover
LawLover
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I should have approached asking this question question/questions differently. I feel bad that I did not. But I should have said, "Is it okay if I take a break from reading the book and do some practice tests or focus on a different part of the test and come back to the RC Bible later? Reason being I feel that it is being repetitive and I need a little break. I will finish the book it was written for a reason and I want to finish the book to get better at RC for the LSAT. I understand that I do not need to write a summary after EVERY paragraph. I am diffidently doing better on the reading comprehension section it seems to me.

sorry for the miswording
LawLover
Dave Killoran
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No, not at all! We don't mind how it's worded, I just wanted to make sure that I was clear in replying since some of the points you raised reflected misconceptions what I know will hurt you :-D

Also, it's totally fine to take a break from the RCB or any book. Breaks in general are good, and I'm all for them!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran