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Contradiction between page 398 and page 546 in LG Bible?

lsat_novice
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The game at the bottom of page 397 in the Logic Games Bible (2018 edition) includes the following rule: “Liu performs on the day immediately before the day Nassif performs.”

At the bottom of the following page, the Bible says:
Note that this rule is not conditional because the language states that L and N both perform; if there had been condition language used (such as “IF Liu performs…” or “on ANY day immediately before”), then the block representation would need to be presented as the necessary portion of a conditional relationship.

Then on page 546 of the Logic Games Bible, a specific game scenario is discussed. The note in the sidebar says:
A game like this one could also include seemingly simple but dangerous rules such as: “Advertisement A always airs earlier than Advertisement B. This rule appears to be a simple sequential rule (A - B), and some students automatically create Not Laws for A on Friday and B on Monday. This is a major mistake because neither A nor B necessarily must air. For example, if A does not air during a given week, then B could air on Monday.

Based on what page 398 says, I assumed that Advertisements A and B would both HAVE to air...because the rule (“Advertisement A always airs earlier than Advertisement B") is in statement form--not in conditional form.
And yet, page 546 says that that is not the case. What am I missing?

Thanks in advance.
Dave Killoran
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Hi Novice,

Thanks for the question! I don't have this in front of me at the moment, but I'll check it later and see if it needs a clarification. If I recall, one of those is a Grouping game with an excess of components where each one is used a maximum of one time, and in the second example isn't that the Numerical Distribution conversation where it contemplates certain variables being used zero to multiple times? That likely has something to do with the point being made, but those rule wordings were based on games where those cases occurred (or didn't as the case may be).

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
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lsat_novice
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Hi, Dave,

Thanks for your response.

You're right...the game on p. 398 is about 10 comics, exactly 8 of whom will perform.
The game on page 546 involves numerical distributions where variables can be used 0 to 2 times.

I just don't see how "Liu performs on the day immediately before the day Nassif performs" is any different than "Advertisement A always airs earlier in the week than Advertisement B." Both rules are part of games where there are "out variables." So why does the first statement tell us that L and N MUST be in the game? But the second statement only tells us that IF A and B are both in the game, A will be earlier than B (even though there is no conditional language)?

Thanks for your patience.
Dave Killoran
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Ok, I had a chance to come back to this while I was making updates to the book, and I decided to change the language on page 546 just to make sure there could be no confusion here :-D That rule now reads: “Advertisement A is never aired later in the week than Advertisement B.” I believe that resolves the issue here, and it's more in line with how they phrase scenarios where it's uncertain if the variables are participating.

Good eye and thanks for pointing that out!
Dave Killoran
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My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran