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LGB 2018 edition: page 97, question 2 and 2.1

nini12
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2018 9:26 pm
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This is with regard to one of the linear setup practice drills. On page 97, question 2 and 2.1. I’m stuck figuring out the not laws for the setup... I was able to find the not law slots/placements for A and D (according to the answer key), howerver I am unable to figure why the not law placements for E under slots 3 and 4 exist. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
Jonathan Evans
PowerScore Staff
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Location: DFW, Texas

Hi, Nini,

Great question! Those are difficult Not Laws™ to spot. Let's take a look at a setup and then go through a step-by-step explanation.

Image

  • Start working from the extremes to find the A and D Not Laws™. You did this. Great job.
  • Now, however, let's think about that Split Block in a different way. Exactly how many possible arrangements are there for the A_D Split Block? There are exactly three. I've plotted them out in green and labeled them alpha α, beta ß, and gamma Γ.
  • If A is first and D is third, check out where E cannot go. It can't go first or third because those spots are occupied. It also can't go second or fourth because then it would be next to D (E can actually only go fifth here!).
  • We repeat the process for A in second and for A in third. Notice each time where E can't go.
  • These three layouts or templates are the only possibilities for the A_D Split Block.
  • Now look at the E Not Laws for all three.
  • There are two E Not Laws common to all three scenarios. E can never be third or fourth. I've highlighted E in purple to illustrate.
  • Therefore, we can conclude that E just doesn't work in 3 or 4. This is where we get those E Not Laws.

This may seem like a lot to do, and, indeed, all this work may not be necessary to solve the questions. However, let's highlight a couple lessons from this scenario:

  1. This is a highly restrictive setup. Since we have only five spaces and a Split Block that takes up a lot of space, it may very well be worth your time to write out the three possibilities.
  2. Linear games that only have six spaces tend to be more restrictive. Seven spaces is the norm. Eight spaces is usually less restrictive and more "wide open."
  3. Slightly more difficult deductions like the ones above usually are not necessary to succeed with a game, but if you identify such deductions, they can save a great deal of time.

I hope this helps!
nini12
LSAT Novice
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2018 9:26 pm
Points: 2

Hello Jonathan,

Thanks. It was really helpful.