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Passage Organization: Revision v Introducing Alternatives

bk1111
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2017 10:11 pm
Points: 104

Hi all - thank you for all your help with answering questions so far. I have a specific question about passage organization questions. These should be relatively easy because I track the passage structure carefully as I read, however, once I get into the answer choices, the similarity between words or slight word shifts get the best of me and I find myself wasting valuable time.

For example - can I get some clarification on the difference between an author "describing alternatives" for a theory, and "revising a theory." Both suggest introducing an approach by the author that is opposed to the "original theory."

In addition - is there anything advice in general regarding these types of questions. I get them correct most of the time - but I think I take much longer on these questions than I should due to these types of "shell" answers.

Thank you!
Francis O'Rourke
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 474
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2017 2:44 pm
Points: 469

hi bk,

If I were to describe an alternative to a theory, then I would be describing a substitute for the original theory. If I were to revise a theory, I would attempt to preserve the original theory in some way, but modify it or add to it in other ways.

The former describes an approach that is much more clearly against the original theory than the latter.

There are an infinite number of phrasings that the LSAT can use to describe different ideas, so you cannot simply memorize every phrase. Rather, if you come across a pair of phrasings like this, I would suggest that you ask yourself if the distinction in wording makes a difference in meaning.
bk1111
LSAT Master
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2017 10:11 pm
Points: 104

Francis O'Rourke wrote:hi bk,

If I were to describe an alternative to a theory, then I would be describing a substitute for the original theory. If I were to revise a theory, I would attempt to preserve the original theory in some way, but modify it or add to it in other ways.

The former describes an approach that is much more clearly against the original theory than the latter.

There are an infinite number of phrasings that the LSAT can use to describe different ideas, so you cannot simply memorize every phrase. Rather, if you come across a pair of phrasings like this, I would suggest that you ask yourself if the distinction in wording makes a difference in meaning.


Thank you! That's extremely helpful. I agree - I will try that approach.