to the top

2-Month Self-Study Plan

futurelawyer22
LSAT Novice
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 6:25 pm
Points: 4

Hello all,

I'm taking the September LSAT. It's my second crack at it, and I've been studying since June, however, I started the 2-month self-study plan with the bibles in July. I know 3 full months would be more beneficial but is 2 months enough time to make a 10+ point increased in a LSAT score? Please let me know.

My apologies if this is a recycled question.
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 3107
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:18 pm
Points: 3,103

Hi Future,

This is a tough question to answer because each person is different. Can two months be enough to increase 10 points? Sure, and I've seen that many, many times, enough to prove to me that is achievable within normal study parameters. Will it be for you? I can't be sure because I don't know anything about your testing history, how well you absorb the logic of the test, how many hours a week you plan to study, etc, and all of those factors play a role in how someone's score increases. I can say this: students who spend more time studying typically do better, so put as much time in as you can :-D

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran
futurelawyer22
LSAT Novice
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 6:25 pm
Points: 4

Thanks for your response!

I typically study 15-20 hours a week. Scoring around 145-150 on prep tests. The study plan is helping tremendously. My speed is fine with LR and RC but LG is a struggle. My accuracy on LG and RC is fine but LR is my weaker section.

What approach should I take in improving besides using the Bible's and prep tests? I really want to get 16 to 18 correct in each section. LR is definitely my weaker point, scoring about 12. RC and LG are both scored around 12-15. If I completed the LG section entirely I could score higher in that section.

Any advice helps, thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 3107
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 1:18 pm
Points: 3,103

LR is all about capturing meaning in the stimulus, seeing the errors the author is making, and reviewing relentlessly until you understand every nuance of each problem. I talk a bit about the process here, which you might find helpful: viewtopic.php?t=15044. Make sure to check the links I posted in there as well, as they reinforce the ideas being referenced. the bottom line is that just doing questions isn't enough, you have to engage with them on a deep level. This is a key idea from that thread:


    To prove whether you really know a question, ask yourself this: if you brought me the LG/LR/RC that troubled you the most, could you explain it to me perfectly right now? If not, that means you didn't study it enough previously. You have to master that which is most difficult, and doing so helps unlock the underlying problems you have.

When you track all your misses and can explain them perfectly, you'll start to see the patterns in the test and in your mistakes. that's when scores start to increase.

Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran