to the top

#15 - Greatly exceeding the recommended daily intake of

Administrator
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 6774
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 4:19 pm
Points: 3,447

Complete Question Explanation

Must Be True. The correct answer choice is (B)

This stimulus presents a fact set, with no conclusion. The facts deal with the danger of exceeding the recommended daily intake of vitamins A and D. This is dangerous, because those vitamins can be toxic at high levels. Each “serving” of some vitamin-fortified foods already has 100 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamins A and D. Unfortunately, “many people” eat more than the manufacture-defined serving of foods, like cereal, that are vitamin-fortified. In fact, these people eat two to three times more than the standard serving.

The stimulus tells us that this is a Must Be True question. The facts in this stimulus connect in more than one instance, giving us a strong prephrase. We know that the manufacturer-defined “servings” of some vitamin-fortified foods contain 100 percent of the daily recommended intake of vitamins A and D, and that many people eat two or three servings at a time. From the combination of these facts, we can infer that many people consume two or three times more Vitamin A and D than is recommended.

We also know that consuming more than the daily recommended amounts is dangerous, because these vitamins can be toxic at high levels. So, we know that the “many people” described in the stimulus are doing something dangerous by eating two or three times more than the defined “serving size.” Be careful not to take this idea too far, however. Although we know these vitamins can be toxic at high levels, we do not know how high those levels need to be before the danger is realized.

Answer choice (A): While many people overestimate the serving size, this does not necessarily mean that few people are aware of the daily recommended intake of vitamins A and D.

Answer choice (B): This is the correct answer choice, because it restates—and modestly at that—our first inference from the stimulus.

Answer choice (C): The mistake attributed to people in the stimulus was the overestimation of the serving size, not a mistaken belief about whether it is healthy to consume more than the recommended daily intake of vitamins A and D.

Answer choice (D): The stimulus dealt only with vitamins A and D. This answer choice is too expansive, applying to all vitamins.

Answer choice (E): The stimulus does not provide any information about what manufacturers know.
Leela
LSAT Leader
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Apr 13, 2019 2:44 pm
Points: 61

My first instinct was to choose answer choice B, but I second guessed myself and chose A instead, not because I thought A was a good answer, but because I thought it was inappropriate to make the inference that's required to get to B. Is there a good rule of thumb for when inferences are okay in must be true questions?
Brook Miscoski
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 422
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018 6:38 am
Points: 421

Leela,

There's no leap required to get to (B). The stimulus tells you that foods are fortified with the vitamins at 100% doses and that people eat several times the recommended allotment, meaning that they eat more than 100% of their doses. If you were concerned about the "some" in the passage leaving open a hole, you should still pick a choice like (B), the gist of the passage, over a choice like (A), a much bigger leap since awareness was never discussed.