to the top

#17 - The difference between manners and morals is that the

jlam061695
LSAT Leader
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2016 9:25 pm
Points: 38

I cannot see at all why A makes sense; how does the stimulus address "causing harm" and where does it mention harm? I chose C because it was the only one that I thought made some sense based on my diagram:

M (manners) :arrow: S (necessarily social in nature)
Mor (morals) :arrow: S (not necessarily social in nature)
___________________________________________________________________
A (when one is alone) :arrow: RE (rules of etiquette cannot be applied)

I interpreted the conclusion in terms of the stimulus:
S (not social, which I interpreted as synonymous with "when one is alone") :arrow: M (manners do not apply, which I translated from "rules of etiquette cannot be applied")

I know that C does not necessarily match up with the conclusion, but I chose it because it stated that "when one is alone," which I thought was synonymous with "not social." I am aware that the "rules of morality" do not necessarily have to apply though.
David Boyle
PowerScore Staff
PowerScore Staff
 
Posts: 853
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 1:25 am
Points: 743

jlam061695 wrote:I cannot see at all why A makes sense; how does the stimulus address "causing harm" and where does it mention harm? I chose C because it was the only one that I thought made some sense based on my diagram:

M (manners) :arrow: S (necessarily social in nature)
Mor (morals) :arrow: S (not necessarily social in nature)
___________________________________________________________________
A (when one is alone) :arrow: RE (rules of etiquette cannot be applied)

I interpreted the conclusion in terms of the stimulus:
S (not social, which I interpreted as synonymous with "when one is alone") :arrow: M (manners do not apply, which I translated from "rules of etiquette cannot be applied")

I know that C does not necessarily match up with the conclusion, but I chose it because it stated that "when one is alone," which I thought was synonymous with "not social." I am aware that the "rules of morality" do not necessarily have to apply though.



Hello,

The stimulus doesn't really discuss harm, but answer A discusses "ever having caused any other person any harm", with "any other person" bringing up the idea of social vs. solo. And one could be immoral by oneself.
As for "Mor (morals) :arrow: S (not necessarily social in nature)", that might be misleading. The stimulus says morals aren't NECESSARILY social, not that they're never social. Sometimes I put a slash through the arrow itself, not through the necessary condition, to indicate that something is not necessarily so, but still possible.
Although "the rules of etiquette do not apply when one is alone", that doesn't mean that the rules of morality don't apply when one is with others. So there's no reason to think that answer C, "The rules of morality apply only when one is alone", is correct.

David