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#20 - When teaching art students about the use of color

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Complete Question Explanation

Question #20: Assumption. The correct answer choice is (D)

Your task in this Assumption question is to select the answer containing information required for the
conclusion to be valid. The argument proceeds:

..... Premise: ..... colored paper readily permits use of exactly the same color in different
..... ..... ..... ..... compositions, allowing for a precise comparison of the color’s impact in
..... ..... ..... ..... varying contexts

..... Premise: ..... but, with paint it is difficult to mix exactly the same color twice, and the
..... ..... ..... ..... varying textures of the applied paint can interfere with the pure effect of the
..... ..... ..... ..... color itself

..... Conclusion: ..... thus, when teaching art students about the use of color, teachers should use
..... ..... ..... ..... colored paper rather than paint in their demonstrations

Your prephrase is that this is a Supporter type Assumption question, and that the correct answer
choice will connect previously unconnected ideas, that something about identifying the impact of
color in varying contexts help students learn about the use of color. This connection needs to be
drawn, because the only preference given for using colored paper is that it permits this comparison
of the color’s impact.

The incorrect choices will not contain information required for the conclusion to be valid. Instead,
these choices will support, have no effect on, or weaken the conclusion.

Answer choice (A): This choice supports the conclusion, but is unnecessarily restrictive, and so is
not required for the conclusion to be valid.

Answer choice (B): This choice has no effect on the conclusion, because the reason to prefer colored
paper was the precision of the comparison, not the ease of observation.

Answer choice (C): This choice supports the conclusion because it provides an example of why
paper is better than paint, but is not required for the conclusion to be valid.

Answer choice (D): This is the correct answer choice. The sole basis for preferring colored paper
over paint is the precise comparison of the color’s impact in varying contexts. If this choice were
negated, such that observing these impacts does not help students learn about the use of color, then
the reason for the preference would be gone, and the conclusion would be invalid.

Answer choice (E): This choice has no effect on the conclusion, because it merely identifies a related
piece of instruction, and does not affect the pertinent comparison between paper and paint.
15veries
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I chose A because in the stimulus it talks about impact in varying context, and recommend to use colored paper. I thought A must be true because if the two paper does not have the same color, it will not lead to the conclusion...
Why is A wrong and C the answer?
Adam Tyson
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Thanks for asking, 15. The problem with A is that the author never assumed anything about using two different pieces of colored paper. All he argued was that using paper allows consistency - take a piece of paper and use it in one context, then move that paper to another context and the color remains the same but the effect may change. It's the consistency of the color of a single piece of paper that matters (as opposed to using paint, which you obviously cannot them pick up and move to another spot). Texture raises a whole different argument, on that he did not make here.

Try negating A - what if two different pieces of paper with the same color but different textures result in different effects in the same context? Does that hurt the argument that the author made, that using paper is better than using paint when trying to teach about color? Not at all - it's not relevant to the question of color. Paper can still be a better choice than paint for the reasons the author gave. Since A, negated, does not hurt the argument, it cannot be an assumption of the argument.

Try that negation technique on Answer C now and see what happens! I think you'll find that it does some major damage to the conclusion that paper is a better choice than paint.

Good luck!
Adam M. Tyson
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srcline@noctrl.edu
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Hello

So these necessary assumptions questions seem to be hit or miss for me, but I wanted to make sure that I was correctly reviewing my test and answers.

So the conclusion is "when teaching art students about the use of color, teachers should use colored paper rather than paint in their demonstrations. Answer choices A and B are not assumptions required by the argument.

So I was in between C and E and D.

After reviewing E is incorrect b/c the a.c. mentions "it is important for art students to understand....but the conclusions isnt about understanding its about use.

C is incorrect because the a.c refers t changing light conditions, but no where in the stimulus does the author mention this and the conclusion is about colored paper being better than paint. So this a.c is no relevant.

So D is the correct answer because if we negate it we get....Observing the impacts of colors across varying contexts does not help students to learn about the use of color. This would weaken the conclusion that colored papers is preferable over paint.

Thankyou
Sarah
Adam Tyson
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Looks good, Sarah! Nice work, you got it!
Adam M. Tyson
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ericau02
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Hi can you please explain the where the restrictive language is in ac A is, and how to identify if the language is more restrictive than it should be in comparison to the stimulus. I am having a hard time noticing how ac A has restrictive language.

During my blind review this was actually my choice.
Brook Miscoski
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Erica,

(A) contradicts the stimulus, which states that the effect of the same color will vary based on context.