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February 10th, 2018 LSAT Information and Discussion

jdubsya95
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lhtaylor96 wrote:Does anyone know what order the experimental were given;

MIne was LGLRLGRCLR and I'm wondering if I had the experimental first or third - I can't recall much about them lol. I also found my first LR quite hard. There were a lot of tough questions. I don't usually find the LR section hard..so that was a bit of a bummer. The second LR was just fine. I was very happy to get two LG sections - that was my ideal I worked through your LG bible, and your question bank - which I was very grateful for. Now I'm not so sure what to do with all my free time : :-?


I had the same order. The first LG was real.
Dave Killoran
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smooth12 wrote:How is it that you know the aforementioned is real and which is experimental already? I'm not doubting since I recognize the question types but was hoping for different games to be real rather than what's listed


By hearing the comments from students who had only a single LG section, we can determine with certainty what was the scored LG and what was not.

I talk more about the idea here: https://www.powerscore.com/lsat/help/experimental.cfm
Dave Killoran
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smooth12
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Does anyone remember how many questions are on the fire alarms and prerequisite games? I thought it was 6 and 5
lhtaylor96
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jdubsya95 wrote:
lhtaylor96 wrote:Does anyone know what order the experimental were given;

MIne was LGLRLGRCLR and I'm wondering if I had the experimental first or third - I can't recall much about them lol. I also found my first LR quite hard. There were a lot of tough questions. I don't usually find the LR section hard..so that was a bit of a bummer. The second LR was just fine. I was very happy to get two LG sections - that was my ideal I worked through your LG bible, and your question bank - which I was very grateful for. Now I'm not so sure what to do with all my free time : :-?


I had the same order. The first LG was real.


Darn, I was hoping the second set were! Boo. Thanks for the info though :)
lhtaylor96
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I have a fairness question.

If they do not provide the Feb LSAT with your score, and they do not provide any info on which questions you got wrong. Does this not disadvantage Feb test takers? How are you to ever challenge a question if you can not have access to the question. This seems unfair.
Francis O'Rourke
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Hi Taylor,

There are some clear disadvantages to taking the February LSAT. Nikki Siclunov wrote a good article about the reasons to take or avoid this exam date. You can read that article here: https://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/why-do ... even-exist.

The downsides that Nikki points out can be unfair, if you absolutely need to take the February exam and only the February exam. Of course, no LSAT is exactly the same as any other LSAT. Certain questions, passages, or games can play to your strengths or weaknesses. For that reason, taking just one test is risky. As Dave Killoran has pointed out, "Welcome to the LSAT Casino!"

The point that you brought up concerning challenges to a specific question is different from what the above articles address. If there happens to be a question that you answered 'incorrectly' due to ambiguous wording or a biased topic, then it would certainly be unfair to not let you challenge the result. This is extremely unlikely to ever happen to you.

First of all, the LSAC applies the same standards of evaluating the validity of answers to the February exam date as it does to every other test date. The questions you answered on the February exam were scrutinized by a number of intelligent and meticulous people. After being verified by these folks, the questions are tested on thousands of test-takers in their experimental sections. If there is any statistically aberrant result, the LSAC will remove that question before you see it on a real section or alter it to eliminate any ambiguity.

Sometimes a poorly constructed question slips through to a real section. This happens very infrequently. A quick search tells me that it occurs on fewer than 10% of exams. (I am not aware of any tests in which multiple questions were removed, but please correct me if I am wrong on this point) The majority of these questions were removed from scoring before the exams were graded and sent back to the test takers, meaning that the LSAC caught many of these mistakes before anyone was given a chance to challenge the results.

Furthermore, You are presenting a situation in which you were unfairly marked down for your answer. However when a question is removed from scoring there are test-takers who benefit from that removal, and there are test takers who do not. If you answered the poorly constructed question 'correctly' you might be frustrated that some other test taker challenged and had a question that you got correct removed from scoring.

Finally, there is no guarantee that getting that one fewer question wrong would help you out. Suppose that you answered 74 out of 101 questions correctly on the September 2016 exam. If you were to have found an ambiguity in a question that was marked incorrect and you won your challenge, the scoring scale would have shifted down by one question on that exam date. This means that your 74 correct answers out of 100 questions would have gotten you a score of ... 160. Exactly the same score as before.

Let's say that your score were to increase by one point after winning a challenge. If you feel that an increase of just one point would increase your odds of getting into your dream school, then relax, because you can get that score increase on the June exam. You may have been set on applying to schools this cycle, but a little bit of extra work between now and June means that you will have much better chances of getting the score you need. So focus on what you can do right now to help yourself out, and get studying! :-D
lhtaylor96
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Thank you for this very thorough response. If you see a duplicate response, apologies, I seem to have deleted my first response accidentally - but am not sure if something else happened.

I appreciated very much the thoroughness of your reply. However, my comment is more directed at pure fairness - from an ethics stand point - whether challenging a question benefits me or does not is secondary - the right to challenge is the focus I have. The fact that some students on some dates are provisioned the ability to challenge questions and other students on others dates - are not - is the issue. Clearly LSAC believes that students should have the ability, as they provision them with this opportunity (and I assume they respond to such challenges) some of the time. For Feb students, the ability to do so, the right to be able to do so - is revoked. Although I understand the points regarding LSAC having intelligent reviewers and mechanisms to catch - by revoking this right for certain tests - it is effective claiming that it couldn't possibly make a mistake that is not caught by their process.

Of course there is the option to not take the Feb test, but again - invoking that right or not invoking it does not change the problem that I see.

Many thanks for your response, it was very much appreciated.
HarvardHopeful
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LSAC just tweeted that they are releasing scores tonight