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Should I cancel my September 2017 LSAT score?

ndimas
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Hi! I have a couple questions. I took the June 2017 LSAT and scored a 151. This is not the that score I need, so I decided to take the September LSAT. I felt really good about the first 3 sections however, once we came back for the 4th section (reading comp) I went into panic mode, and I know I performed badly on that section. After reading online forums regarding the experimental sections, I am positive the 4th section was not the experimental section. Thus, I will be graded on that section. I know that I am capable of performing much better on reading comp, and I am really bummed out that I went into panic mode. Therefore, I know that the score that I will be receiving on the exam is not a true reflection of what I am capable of. During my self-administered practice exams, I felt more confident on the reading comp sections. However, I know that I tanked the reading comp section during yesterday's LSAT. I have now signed up for the December 2017 LSAT and am going to give it another shot. Do you think that I should cancel my September score as I know it is not an accurate reflection of what I am capable of? Also, if I chose to cancel, will it look bad to law schools that I have a 151, a cancelled score, and then my final December score?
Adam Tyson
PowerScore Staff
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Thanks for the question, ndimas, and sorry to hear things didn't go so well for you this time around. From the sound of it, though, with only one section that went badly you might nonetheless be looking at a score higher than your previous score, and since you don't know what will happen in December I can't see keeping this score as being a bad thing. If it goes up, then that becomes your new high score, and that's a good thing. If it goes down, then your old one is still your high score and nothing has changed. December might raise it, in which case you'd have nothing to fear from having kept this recent score. Unless you know for sure that your score went down this time (and with 3 sections having gone at least somewhat well, it doesn't sound like you are certain of such a drop), I think you should probably not cancel and see what you get.

For more insight on the decision to cancel, here are two recent posts from our glorious leader Dave Killoran that should shed a little light on things and help you with your decision:

viewtopic.php?t=15269&p=39907#p39907

viewtopic.php?t=15266&p=39908#p39908

Meanwhile, whatever you decide to do, return to your studies with a plan for December, including a calendar of which practice tests you will take and when you will take them so you can be sure to keep moving on course for the next 10 weeks or so. When you get your score (which we predict will be right around the official release date of October 12th), if you are pleasantly surprised and get a better score than you thought then you can then decide whether to make that third attempt or not.

Good luck, whatever you decide to do! Keep pounding!
Adam M. Tyson
PowerScore LSAT, GRE, ACT and SAT Instructor
Follow me on Twitter at https://twitter.com/66adamt
ndimas
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat May 13, 2017 2:02 am
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Thank you for your advice!! If I decide to keep my score and I end up getting lower than a 151, will this look really bad to the law schools? Regardless, I plan to take the December 2017 test whether I decide to keep my September score or not. I want to give myself one last chance to really improve my score. I just don't know if a 151, a cancelled score, and then my December score is a better option than a 151, a potentially lower score than a 151, and then my December score. I would really appreciate your advice. Thank you again!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Staff
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ndimas wrote:Thank you for your advice!! If I decide to keep my score and I end up getting lower than a 151, will this look really bad to the law schools?


No, it won't be bad at all. This article should help you feel a bit better about the focus law schools have on the high score—that's what matters to them! Should You Retake the LSAT? Admissions Experts Agree: Yes!. The high score is what the ABA uses, so that's the only score that law schools care about. So, you can move forward without worry :-D

Let us know what we can do to help. Thanks!
Dave Killoran
PowerScore Test Preparation
Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/DaveKilloran
My LSAT Articles: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/author/dave-killoran
ndimas
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat May 13, 2017 2:02 am
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Thank you for your advice! I will keep my score and still plan to take it again in September. I took your in person Powerscore LSAT course leading up to the June 2017 test. For the September LSAT, I used the online student center and self-studied. I have taken the 69-81 prep-tests throughout these past couple of months. Also, I have finished up most of the Bibles however, I stopped using them once I signed up for the in person course and used the study material from the course. How should I prepare for the December exam? Should I retake the more recent LSAT prep tests or take the older ones that I have not taken. As I work full time, I am able to take my practice tests over the weekends. Should I continue to test on the weekends and throughout the week go over the lessons through the online student center? Thank you!
AthenaDalton
PowerScore Staff
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Hi ndmas,

You'll gain the most from using old practice tests that you've never seen before. Re-taking newer tests will not give you the best assessment of your progress. I think your plan of taking practice tests over the weekend and carefully reviewing your wrong answers is a good approach. During the week, focus on your areas of weakness by using the online materials. At this point, you should have a good idea of your areas of strength and weakness so feel free to prioritize your time by skipping portions of the lessons that you've already mastered.

Good luck studying, and stay in touch! We're here to help you along the way!
ndimas
LSAT Apprentice
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat May 13, 2017 2:02 am
Points: 10

Hi AthenaDalton,

Okay great! Thank you for the tips. I will definitely implement them in my studies!